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Yachting World

Fastest sailboats: The teams aiming for a record-breaking 80 knots

It’s been nearly a decade since Sailrocket set a new record to become the world’s fastest sailboat. Now two teams are hoping to set a new record with their radical designs A little over a decade ago the race to create the fastest sailboat, or fastest sail-powered watercraft was on. Ultimately it was Vestas Sailrocket 2 that claimed a new speed sailing record with such a significant jump that the competition cooled for some years. Now, a French team and a Swiss team are both hoping to set a new record and in so doing become the fastest sailboat known to man. The 50 knot mark had long been referenced as sailing’s sound barrier due to the difficulty of making a craft capable of sustaining speeds over that elusive figure. But with everyone from kitesurfers, to windsurfers, and purpose built boats aiming at that target, it was only a matter of time before it fell. When, in 2012 Paul Larson’s Vestas Sailrocket 2 smashed the previous record, posting a new outright world record of 65.54 knots, they easily become the fastest sailboat to ever take to the water. Specialised foils Sailrocket was a very advanced concept-boat and one of the many keys to their record breaking was the development of a supercavitating foil. Put simply, cavitation occurs when the water flow on the low pressure side of a foil gets so low that it ceases over the foil surface and a vacuum or cavity appears – usually at around 50 knots. Larson and his team produced a foil with a large flat trailing edge, which, at speed, forced the water to detach from the trailing edge and create a void in the water, essentially in the shape of a foil, but not made of anything solid. This is often referred to as a ‘supercavitating’ foil, as it uses the cavitation to positive effect, actively encouraging that cavitation in the desired fashion. Having proved the concept with their record run, all had gone quiet on the speed sailing boat front and it looked as though the fight to create the world’s fastest sailboat was done. Now, it would seem, the fight

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Yachting World

First look: McConaghy Makara 85

Sam Fortescue takes a first look at the Makara 85, the first of a new range of semi-custom yachts from designer Malcolm McKeon and builders McConaghy Designer Malcolm McKeon has deepened his collaboration with composite wizards McConaghy by launching a range of semi-custom sailing yachts running from 85ft up to 120ft. The first of these new yachts to be announced is the Makara 85. Dubbed Makara, the new line is aimed at comfortable family cruising with the option of taking to the race course short-handed. For that reason, the boats look sporty, with a defined hull chine, a low-profile coachroof and plenty of dark glass. “Our target market is sailors that enjoy the ease of sail handling that modern systems can provide,” explains McConaghy MD Mark Evans. “This yacht will perform in light winds which will make the whole experience very enjoyable, but the Makara yachts will also perform around a racecourse – easily sailed by a group of friends.” The boats are light, thanks to lay-up in pre-preg carbon with structural foam core: the Makara 85 displaces just 48 tonnes lightship. The sloop rig comes from Southern Spars, and owners can opt for a bowsprit and a lifting keel if they want to supercharge performance. Sail controls are all via push-button hydraulics, making single-handing a genuine reality. On the other hand, there is room for a complement of up to three crew, and the cockpit is designed to allow guests to stay clear of sailing operations. Makara 85 can be built with a high level of customisation input from the customer The interior is modular, with four possible layouts including the choice of putting the master cabin forward or aft and up to three large guest cabins. Finish is a matter of choice, but oak and walnut veneers are suggested options, as is a smoother minimalist grey. “For a client wanting to be involved in the build process, and wanting to work with the yard or interior designers to create a yacht that meets their exact wishes, the Makara range is ideal,” adds Evans. The McConaghy yard has long been known for smaller feats of carbon fibre wizardry, carving

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Yachting World

Want to work for Yachting World?

A rare opportunity has arisen to join the Yachting World ranks. Find out how you could become part of the world’s best known sailing magazine. Yachting World is the world’s best known sailing magazine. Today, we produce 12 issues of Yachting World, three issues of Supersail World, and three Multihull special issues in print each year. Meanwhile online Yachtingworld.com is the world’s top-ranking (non-forum) sailing website, and our YouTube channel has been viewed over 40 million times. We are looking for a talented all-rounder to join our small and committed team on this iconic brand. You will be a skilled and driven print and digital journalist who understands the Yachting World audience and can write knowledgeably about sailing. You will know how to create quality content and will be writing news, reviews, features and more for Yachting World magazine and yachtingworld.com. You will be responsible for creating and commissioning targeted content for both print and digital outlets, and the maintenance and optimisation of online content. You can write accurately and compellingly about adventurous cruising, racing and events, comprehensive buying guides, product reviews and yachting news. You must also have good awareness of how images and content work together in print layout, and will work closely with our subbing and production teams. You will understand how video can support our online content, basic video production/editing skills would be a bonus. The Staff Writer position requires fantastic organisational and time-management skills. You will be a self-starter, and able to work within a small team, as well as to adapt quickly while working in a fast paced and ambitious environment. Key role responsibilities Managing and writing content for both print and online, and supporting the existing team to develop the Yachting World brand Writing news, feature articles, product reviews and comparisons, how-to practical content and buying guides. Managing multiple audience strategies, including SEO and social channels Working with our digital team to explore new opportunities for content initiatives, based on keyword research and e-commerce opportunities. Liaising with other teams in the business, such as advertising and audience development. Requirements What do I need to succeed? Proven ability to write high quality engaging content

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Yachting World

Save the date: Pip Hare’s Ask Me Anything session on YBW

Pip Hare, regular Yachting World contributor, Vendée Globe hero, and all-round brilliant sailor will be the guest for YBW’s second ever Ask Me Anything session Pip Hare celebrates with Champagne after arriving back on the dock at Les Sables d’Olonne. Photo Richard Langdon / Ocean Images On Thursday 22 April, Pip Hare, who recently completed the Vendée Globe, will be our second special guest in a new series of Ask Me Anything sessions on the YBW forum. Pip Hare, amassed a huge following during her exploits in the 2020/21 Vendée Globe crossing the finish line in an impressive 19th place despite having one of the oldest boats in the fleet and one of the smallest budgets. She is only the 8th ever female skipper to complete the Vendée Globe. Pip faced a raft of difficulties during her Vendée Globe race, at the end of November 2020 her boat, Medallia lost one of its hydrogenerators, meaning she had to save her diesel reserves for power generation, leaving her with no heating in the south. Pip delighted with her rudder repair in the 2020/21 Vendée Globe On 2 January her wind sensor broke down, leaving her with no reliable wind information. Her only option was to set her autopilot to compass mode, sleeping with one hand on the pilot remote control at all times in case of sudden wind shifts. It seemed disaster had struck mid-Pacific, when her port rudder stock cracked and it looked, briefly, as if Pip’s competitive race would be over. She was, she admitted, devastated. However, in a typical can-do attitude, Pip Hare managed to remove and replace the rudder, and resumed racing having lost just two places. During the course of the race, Pip Hare’s brilliant communication – be it written or via her regular video reports – showed everyone what Yachting World has known for many years; not only is she a gifted sailor, but she is a talented communicator too. Pip Hare rounds Cape Horn in the Vendée Globe 2020/21 So who better to ask along for our second Ask My Anything session over on the YBW forum? Pip will be joining us on the

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Yachting World

First look: Brooklin Boat Yard / Jim Taylor 44

Rupert Holmes gets the inside line on the latest collaboration between Brooklyn Boat Yard and designer, Jim Taylor, the Brooklin Boat Yard / Jim Taylor 44 The Brooklin Boat Yard in Maine is a giant in New England’s Spirit of Tradition scene. Once again they are teaming up with designer, Jim Taylor to produce a new boat, the Brooklin Boat Yard / Jim Taylor 44. Of the 10 yachts in the class racing in last year’s popular Eggemoggin Reach Regatta, nine had been built by the Brooklyn Boat Yard. Among them was the winner Rascal, a Jim Taylor-designed 50-footer launched only three days before the event. Rascal is a 50-footer designed by Jim Taylor and built by the Brooklin Boat Yard. Photo: Billy Black The latest collaboration between Taylor and Brooklin is Equipoise, a stunning 44ft performance dayboat. Her design draws on a long line of previous craft, including Rascal and the slightly earlier 49-footers Dreadnaught and Blackfish. Indeed, the new vessel will be for the owner of one of these boats who sails in southern California during the winter months. Equipoise’s hull is of an engineered timber/epoxy construction, with two diagonal 3/16in (5mm) paulonia veneers sandwiched in the middle of twin layers of tongue-and-groove larch planking. Article continues below… First look: J/45, Solaris 60, and Linjett 39 Manufacturers are continuing to design and build innovative new boats in 2021. This month, we’re looking at three new yachts… MW40OF first look: An easy to look after, marina friendly foiler History tells us that unfamiliar Argentine names in yacht design are not to be underestimated and if the drawing of… The Brooklin Boat Yard / Jim Taylor 44’s deck has two skins of okoume plywood with Corecell foam between them, while keel loads are distributed by a grid of laminated floors, capped with unidirectional carbon fibre. Taylor says this construction “results in high strength and toughness relative to weight and also provides very impressive acoustic and thermal insulation.” Displacement is little more than six tonnes, despite a hefty 44% ballast ratio. This allows a large rig to be carried without the L-shaped bulb keel needing an excessive draught. “Throughout, the focus

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Yachting World

Match racing tactics: Ian Williams on America’s Cup moves

Andy Rice, talks to six-time match racing world champion and the most successful skipper on the World Match Racing Tour, Ian Williams about America’s Cup match racing There’s no question: the final Prada Cup Round Robin race between INEOS Team UK and Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli was any absolute humdinger. With nine lead changes, this scorcher of a three-lap battle demonstrated many of the critical features of match racing in the foiling AC75s. Who better than British match racing supremo Ian Williams to explain the tactics behind the manoeuvres? “This was a very interesting race due to the fact that Luna Rossa had an apparent boat speed superiority, but INEOS Team UK appeared more confident in their manoeuvres,” explains Williams. “Normally in match racing you’d always take the boat speed advantage, but the boundaries [on an America’s Cup course] mean it is easy to get forced out of phase with the wind shifts. “When that happens, you have to do an extra manoeuvre to get back in phase – but it is very tricky to know when to do that, particularly if there is the risk of a big loss in that manoeuvre.” Here, Ian analyses some of the key manoeuvres that the AC75 crews have had to master on the 50-knot foiling machines… Start to leeward At the start, the key goal for the leeward boat is to be nice and tight to leeward of the boat to windward. In this race I think the start was a clear win for Luna Rossa. They came back very early for the line and you could hear both Ben [Ainslie] and Giles [Scott] confirm that they thought Luna Rossa were too early. INEOS tacked in a nice spot to windward, but then had a choice to make. One option was to push hard with a view to either ‘hooking’ the other boat (and forcing them either head to wind or into a tack), or push them to be early for the line. The other was a ‘soft push’ where you feign the hook but actually your goal is to maintain separation. INEOS pushed hard but neither got the hook nor forced

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Yachting World

Five very different Atlantic crossing experiences

Elaine Bunting speaks to five very different crews, all of who had a very different Atlantic crossing experience during this year’s ARC On the first night of their Atlantic crossing, a ‘dark shadow’ passed 100m away from Christian and Manuela Lücking’s boat. It was unlit and not moving. Unnerved, Christian Lücking called the Coastguard. Two hours later, the Coastguard called back asking them to return and check the vessel. When they returned, they found a wooden fishing boat, around 10m long, with a 40hp Yamaha outboard on the back. It was deserted and empty apart from a solitary lifejacket hooked on the bow. The Coastguard concluded that it had been packed with migrants fleeing through Mauritania, and abandoned after they swam ashore to one of the Canary Islands. Abandoned fishing boat off the Canary Islands Shaken, the Lückings resumed their course, let draw and returned to the route being taken by the 84 crews in this year’s ARC and ARC+ rallies south-west towards St Lucia. The Swiss couple class themselves as beginners in the realm of ocean sailing. Their Enksail Noordkaper 40, a pretty, traditional-style long keeled pilothouse cutter, custom built in steel by Dutch yard Gebroeders van Enkhuizen, was launched in 2018. Svala is a sturdy design, beautifully fitted out, designed to take its crew anywhere in comfort. Sailing double-handed on their first Atlantic crossing, the Lückings were not seeking any dramas. But a day later, they picked up a Mayday from a boat ahead. The skipper said they were being pursued by a small motorboat. The Lückings misheard it as ‘persuded’ and were mystified, but worked it out when another ARC yacht just ahead of them proposed turning upwind and motorsailing for four or five hours, reasoning that a small motorboat would be unable to keep up. Both yachts did so before turning back and carrying on. Nothing further was seen or heard of the ‘pirate’ boat but the Lückings were at Code Red, though their ARC adventure had barely begun. Rush across the Atlantic Ian and Nia Baylis were in much more of a rush on their Atlantic crossing. Indeed, Rush is what they call their Pogo

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Yachting World

First look Aeolos P30: lightweight downwind flyer

Rupert Holmes gets a first look at a new competitively-priced Aeolos P30. A lightweight boat which should offer stunning performance, particularly off the wind The Aeolos P30 is a competitively priced, but very fast, ‘carbon fun rocket’ aimed at the market for single and double-handed offshore racing, plus inshore racing with a team of up to six people. It was developed by Dubai-based German engineer Hans Genthe, a double winner of the massively popular Danish 140 mile single-handed Silverrudder race, sailing a Farr 280. He has avoided compromising the key concept of a simple and very lightweight, yet robust, boat in order to satisfy the needs of specific rating rules, or to follow popular design trends. However, where it’s been possible to do so within his vision Genthe has optimised the Aeolos P30 for ORC. A heavier version, with a different keel, is also available for IRC. The result is a lightweight boat with overall displacement little more than half that of some IRC yachts of similar size. Stunning performance, particularly off the wind, is therefore assured. Aeolos P30 design is optimised for sailing in the Baltic and on the UK south coast The Aeolos P30 has been optimised for short and medium distance racing in 12 to 14 knots of wind. The thinking behind this decision is that this wind range represents the conditions most frequently encountered in the Baltic and on the south coast of the UK. Article continues below… Video: Taking the Farr 280 for a spin, Matthew Sheahan discovers a potent 28 footer At 28ft LOA and weighing in at 1600kg with a downwind sail area that is just short of three times… MW40OF first look: An easy to look after, marina friendly foiler History tells us that unfamiliar Argentine names in yacht design are not to be underestimated and if the drawing of… CFD analysis showed the optimal configuration for these conditions to be a single rudder, plus a canoe body with minimal wetted surface area. Even so, the hull shape features many of the characteristics we’ve come to expect in today’s yachts, including a reverse bow and chined topsides. However, overall the Aeolos P30

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Yachting World

Marine electronics: the latest new gear for 2021

Rupert Holmes takes a look at some of the lates marine electronics to hit the market in 2021. It seems every year the technology available to sailors is improving and broadening and 2021 is already delivering innovative new marine electronics from radical new ideas to improvements on well-known technology. Extra wide 210D chartplotter has two 10in screens working together in one unit A new Model for marine electronics? A possible taste of the future, with the potential to fundamentally change our long-term relationship with marine electronics, is offered by Finnish company Next Four. Historically we’ve been accustomed to new yachts being fitted with equipment from one of the big marine electronics brands – Raymarine, Navico (including B&G), Garmin and so on. However, Next Four’s Q Experience range is intended to form a single integrated system that can be customised by boatbuilders to offer exactly what they believe will best suit each of their models. Article continues below… This customisation can include specific screen layouts and datasets, as well as the boat manufacturer’s own branding. In this respect the concept has more in common with cars than marine. Other than very high-end systems, such as the Harman/Kardon or Bowers & Wilkins audio systems offered as options by BMW, we’re no longer routinely accustomed to seeing third party branded equipment in our cars. Q Display 2 Series 16in MFD The Q Experience system consists of three key elements – Q Panel touch screen displays in 10in, 16in and ultra-wide screen formats, a remote control unit, digital switching system and mobile app. There’s also integrated boat guard monitoring and antitheft functionality that connects to 4G networks, plus remote heater operation. It therefore offers the potential for a streamlined and integrated approach covering both navigation and the operation of every element of the boat’s systems. Traditionalists may argue that the lack of conventional 4in instrument displays is a weakness. However, these are increasingly anachronistic – if I was equipping a yacht from scratch today, whether as a new build or a refit, I’d most likely opt instead for the flexibility of small MFD displays to display instrument data. Q Experience Remote Adoption has initially

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Yachting World

MW40OF first look: An easy to look after, marina friendly foiler

The MW40OF is an exciting new foiling design aimed at crewed offshore racing and the designers claim she will be marina friendly and fairly hassle free. Rupert Holmes reports. History tells us that unfamiliar Argentine names in yacht design are not to be underestimated and if the drawing of the new MW40OF is anything to go by, you can see why. The country has produced many of the world’s most successful naval architects, including Javier Soto Acebal, Juan Kouyoumdjian and three generations of the Frèrs family. Less well known, at least to date, are Laureano Marquinez and Nahuel Wilson. They set up their own practice five years ago after working on world-class projects for both Acebal and Juan K. Significantly, the pair are also responsible for the Persico 69F foiling monohull. Many of the lessons gained from refining that design have gone into this full-foiling 40ft offshore racer. It’s envisaged as a custom yacht that will kick start a new generation of coastal/offshore racing designs. “We think there are many sailors who’d be enthusiastic about the idea of stepping up into foiling with fully crewed boats in long-distance races,” Marquinez explains, “particularly if the boats are manageable and sufficiently easy to make the learning curve for foiling a fun process.” Safety and simplicity are therefore fundamental driving factors behind the concept, so the designers haven’t produced a boat capable of foiling tacks and gybes. However, it is a full-flying set-up, including T-foils on the rudders, rather than the foil-assisted set-up adopted by designs such as the Figaro 3. Initial studies show 12 knots of true wind speed as being sufficient for take off, with 15 knots enough for upwind foiling at wide wind angles. Article continues below… Mills 60 Flying Nikka: America’s Cup tech for the Med circuit Given the history of the America’s Cup, which has provided the sailing world with the benefit of equipment ranging from… Monofoil: The pocket rocket that can foil in just 8 knots of breeze The spectacle of a flying catamaran, be it an Olympic Nacra 17, a GC32, the recent America’s Cup 50-footers, or… It’s anticipated the MW40OF will be sailed by a

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Yachting World

America’s Cup: New Zealand win a fourth America’s Cup

Emirates Team New Zealand have won the 36th America’s Cup, New Zealands fourth Cup victory and second successful defence. Emirates Team New Zealand have successfully defended the 36th America’s Cup, giving the kiwis their second successful defence and fourth America’s Cup win after victories in 1994, 2000, 2017 and now 2021. In a series that began much closer than many expected, – when the rumours of a much faster boat developed by Emirates Team New Zealand did not fully come to fruition – the New Zealanders really stretched away in the later part of the regatta, winning the last four races in a row and winning the event by 7 races to 3. Emirates Team New Zealand celebrate their successful America’s Cup defence. Photo: ACE / Studio Borlenghi Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli put up an impressive fight early on in the event and had clearly developed a slick package that was able to match the New Zealand boat in some conditions. But in the end the Kiwis did have a slight speed advantage across the range of conditions. And as the event unfolded this slight advantage looked increasingly too much for the Italian team. It has been an incredibly interesting contest in this 36th America’s Cup, with the first generation of the new AC75s delivering some interesting racing. The Cup match itself has seen two boats developed independently that behave in different ways. The Italians’ boat could clearly point higher than the Kiwis and early in the regatta they could tack faster too, but this tacking advantage became less pronounced as the event continued and the Kiwis developed their tacking ability. Though their boat was not able to point as high, Emirates Team New Zealand always had a faster boat downwind and, given space to sail low and fast, were a click quicker upwind too. Final America’s Cup race Today (Wednesday 17th March) saw a small delay before the breeze properly came in and blew at around 10-12 knots. Starts have been critical in this match and that was the case again today if in a slightly different way. In the prestart you could hear both teams discussing the right

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