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Golden Globe Race favourite Damien Guillou faces mid-ocean rudder repairs

Damien Guillou, one of the favourites in this year’s singlehanded Golden Globe Race, is facing mid-ocean repairs to his self-steering gear in the South Atlantic, while British leader Simon Curwen gets stuck up his mast Damien Guillou training off Lorient ahead of the 2022 Golden Globe Race ©Yann Riou – polaRYSE / PRB French skipper Damien Guillou, one of the pre-race favourites in this year’s solo Golden Globe Race, is facing his second major windvane breakage, which will require significant mid-ocean repairs if he is to remain in contention in the race. Damien Guillou, an extremely experienced offshore racer and IMOCA boat captain, is racing a Rustler 36 with sponsorship from PRB. Given his race background and extremely well-prepared boat, Guillou was expected to be among the front runners in this solo non-stop ‘retro’ around the world race. However, he had to return to port just four days after the start to fix the mount for his Hydrovane self steering system. The starboard screw/axle windvane attachment to the transom of his Rustler 36 had broken while sailing in 30 knots headwinds and heavy seas in the Bay of Biscay in the opening stages of the race. ‘I was going upwind close-hauled in strong headwinds and heavy seas, which is not a point of sail where the windvane is under strong pressure,” Guillou explained at the time. “Once this [lower starboard] screw broke, and we lost one of the three fittings, the rudder acted as a lever. I tried to use lines to stabilise the system and fit a new axis, to no avail in the wind conditions and sea state of that night.” After returning to port, and fixing the axle – in part with the help of Vendée Globe legendary skipper and long-time PRB sailor Vincent Riou – Guillou restarted, six days and some 700 miles behind the fleet. Guillou setting off to restart the Golden Globe Race after making repairs to his the bracket for his wind vane after suffering damage in Biscay. Photo: GGR Guillou does a ‘Desjoyeaux’ Guillou rapidly made up the miles, and was back in touch with the main pack by the Canaries. His race called

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Yachting World

How to follow the Rolex Middle Sea Race

The 43rd Rolex Middle Sea Race starts this weekend from its spectacular start line in the middle of Valetta harbour, in Malta. The iconic Rolex Middle Sea Race startline. Photo: Rolex/Kurt Arrigo The Rolex Middle Sea Race is one of the classic 600-mile offshores, but the only one that takes place in the Mediterranean. Despite its scenic backdrop, the Middle Sea Race is run over a genuinely challenging course – an anticlockwise loop around Sicily which usually provides varied conditions and requires complex tactical decisions. The race often draws some of the biggest boats on the offshore racing scene chasing for the prestigious line honours win. However, the 2022 edition of the Middle Sea Race has a surprising lack of maxi monohulls making an appearance, with neither defending champions Comanche, nor Skorpios or Rambler 88 (also past challengers for line honours) taking part this year. The largest yacht competing in the IRC monohull fleet this year is the 100ft Leopard 3, a likely contender for monohull line honours. Their nearest challengers in size is the Wally/Judel Vrolijk-designed Bullit, at 93ft, followed by the Marten 72 Aragon. Some of the closest racing is likely to be among the 60-70-footers, which includes Vismara, Botin and other custom designs racing against VO60, VO65 and VO70 ocean warhorses.   Rolex Middle Sea Race course The start and finish of the 606-nautical mile Middle Sea Race take place in Grand Harbour, Malta. The course sees the boats sail counter-clockwise around Sicily and a number of surrounding islands. Shortly after the start the fleet must sail along the eastern coast of Sicily and through the Straits of Messina, considered one of the most technically demanding parts of the course thanks to its challenging currents and funnelling winds: the whole event can often be won or lost in this early part of the course. Once through the Straits the course leads north to the Aeolian Islands and the active volcano of Stromboli where the yachts turn west to the Egadi Islands. The fastest yachts will endeavour to complete the course in less than 48 hours. Last year ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ conditions resulted in the course record being broken for

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Yachting World

Extraordinary boat: S&S 61 Running Tide

Running TIde was one of the most successful S&S-designed racing yachts of the 1970s. Bought back to the USA by one of the original owners 30 years later, it’s undergone a stunning refit to race again. Helen Fretter reports Taller, lighter carbon rig led to a 20% increase in sail area. Photo: Billy Black There are some yachts which are beautiful, some which are successful, and some which are well loved. It’s a rare boat which combines all three, but Running Tide has always been that yacht. The S&S 61 was originally commissioned by passionate big-boat racer Jakob Isbrandtsen, and on its launch in 1969 was one of the earliest stripped-out racers, designed for performance with scant consideration for comfort by the standards of the day. Built of aluminium plating by Huisman in the Netherlands, the design represented an evolution for Olin Stephens, with a relatively slender beam, long forward overhangs and a separate keel and skeg-hung rudder. Running Tide was fast on its debut, winning class in the 1970 Newport-Bermuda Race for Isbrandtsen, and the following year taking overall victory in Florida’s SORC circuit. The yacht was briefly leased to ocean racer Ted Turner. Turner was so taken by Running Tide that he tried to buy it, but ended up in a bidding war with property developer Al Van Metre. Van Metre took ownership in 1972, while Turner bought Tenacious, a former America’s Cup 12-Metre, and the two continued their rivalry on the racecourse, exchanging podium places at many of the major American offshores and big-boat series. In one Miami-Nassau race the two boats were inseparable for nearly 200 miles, the race result eventually decided in the protest room (in Tide’s favour) after a luffing match midway across the Straits of Florida. The Washington Post reported that in the 1979 Annapolis-Newport race, Running Tide and Tenacious again duelled side by side, until “Tenacious went out to sea, following the rhumb line in light air toward the tip of Long Island; Tide ran up the coast, reaching for thermals that never developed. Turner arrived in Newport hours ahead of Tide. Van Metre, gracious in defeat, bought dinner for the entire

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Yachting World

Second hand boats: buying a yacht in Europe

Buying a yacht in the EU is more complicated than it once was, following Brexit, but there’s now a growing bank of knowledge on how to smooth the process. We get expert advice on some of the key questions. Double VAT, the Schengen zone, the 180-day rule; the list of considerations when considering buying a yacht in Europe is long and, in some cases, very complex. Crucial to understanding is having a grasp of some of the legal and tax principles that govern making a purchase. The following is not intended to be comprehensive and we advise getting specialist guidance from a tax adviser or similar. Linda Jacques, partner at LA Law, a firm specialising in marine law and yacht transactions, says the first thing you should consider is where you are going to use the yacht you’re thinking of buying. “Since leaving the EU, it is true that things have got more complicated, but the principal legal questions surrounding ownership and tax haven’t changed that much. A lot revolves around the location of the yacht,” explains Jacques. “First, before you start looking to buy, consider where you are going to flag moor the yacht.” Jonathan Hadley-Piggin, a partner at Keystone Law, explains that location is also crucial to the transaction. “Making a purchase of a yacht within an EU country isn’t the problem people often see it to be, but you need to be clear if you are paying VAT or if VAT is already paid and provable. Under some circumstances VAT can be avoided by concluding the sale outside EU territorial waters.” UK Border Force reporting form C1331 The VAT factor VAT is often the first concern that comes to mind for potential buyers because it can make a 20% difference in price. As Jacques explains, one of the challenges of Brexit is that you can end up having to pay tax again when you return your yacht to the UK. “Buy the yacht in Europe and keep it there and you don’t have a problem, as long as EU VAT has already been paid and can be clearly proven. Yachts within EU waters must be EU VAT

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Yachting World

Great Seamanship: sailing through desert storms in the Suez Canal

Tom Cunliffe introduces this extract from Sailing Suleika, the tale of Dennis Krebs taking a steel ketch through the Red Sea Sailing Suleika by Dennis Krebs is a long sea-mile from a typical description of an extended cruise. Dennis met up with the 43ft steel ketch and her redoubtable skipper, Sally, when he was stationed on an island half-way between New Zealand and Fiji. Sally and Suleika were on their way around the world from Shoreham in Sussex, UK. Dennis signed on and sailed, as ‘bosun, musician, chef and first engineer’. It turns out that Dennis’s talents do not end with the engine room and the galley. His writing is fast, pithy and often extremely funny. It has always been the mark of the true sailor that he makes light of his troubles. The extract below takes us with him and his skipper on the first part of their passage north up the Red Sea where troubles come thick and fast. Join them as we contemplate the aptly named ‘Gate of Sorrows’ together. Approaching the Straits of Bab el Mandeb – the Gates of Sorrow, named for reasons we hoped never to encounter – there remained 1,200 miles to the Gulf of Suez. Then another 150 miles to Port Suez and the start of the Suez Canal, leading to the Mediterranean Sea. There are yachting tales concerning travels up this sea which run from the delightful – 10 days of a southerly taking them all the way non-stop – to those which have taken three to four months, to those who never made it at all, and worse, those who have disappeared without trace. Sailing Suleika by Dennis Krebs Come 1100 on the morning of 4 March, the wind whispered then strengthened from a southerly direction. We hauled up the anchor, and before long were sailing in 20 knots making good progress towards the straits. “Oh, wouldn’t it be wonderful if it stayed like this for five or six days and got us halfway up in one shot?” said Skip, looking forward to the challenge. “It sure would,” I replied, fingers crossed. At this point she went forward to tighten

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Yachting World

How to recover a man overboard

Man overboard recovery is a key drill for Clipper Race crews. Winning skipper Chris Brooks shares some key tips on the process with Andy Rice After 45,000 nautical miles racing in the Clipper Round the World Race, skipper Chris Brooks was relieved that his crew on Qingdao never had to put their well-rehearsed Man Overboard (MOB) drills into practice. With Clipper Race crews covering thousands of sea miles there are strict rules to avoid MOB situations. “It’s a race for amateurs, many of them with very little prior experience of sailing, so there are a lot of rules we abide by on the boat. When the wind is over 15 knots, we’re clipped on at all times. At night, we’re clipped on at all times. So people get used to working quite efficiently with their tethers, unclipping out of one place and clipping on in another place smoothly and quickly. Like anything, with practice it becomes quite a skill,” explains Brooks. There is also the relentless training of MOB drills. “People get four weeks of training before the start of the race, and pretty much every day of the training we’ll practise a MOB. “We use a 50kg dummy, which is not as heavy as most sailors but still heavy enough for people to understand how difficult it is to lift a body out of the water, especially when all the clothes are sodden and their boots are full of water. “I used to try and do the MOB drills at night with a spinnaker as well. What’s the most likely and most difficult scenario that we might encounter for a MOB situation? The answer is windy conditions at night with a spinnaker up. So that’s what we practised.” Man overboard check sheet Keep a check sheet for your MOB process at key places around the boat. On Qingdao we had laminated copies in the heads, at the nav station and in the galley too. So when you’re using the heads, you’re seeing the check sheet right in your eyeline, and it ensures the process becomes ingrained in your memory. Blow the tack Some skippers believe that you should get

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Yachting World

Stan Honey: the smartest man in yachting?

Stan Honey’s career is unrivalled: from breaking records on the water in some of the world’s toughest offshores, to technical innovations of it. Sean McNeill chats to the smartest man in yachting Stan Honey’s first ever offshore race set the tone for his career. Then a lean and mean 14-year-old racing Lasers out of the Los Angeles Yacht Club, Honey already had an interest in all things technical.In 1969 Stan Honey had the opportunity to go yacht racing, and took on the dual roles of navigator and bowman on his offshore debut, not only earning his place on the boat, but taking a seat at the adults’ table. “It was an absolutely riveting experience,” recalls Honey. “The thing I found most engaging was the ability to compete against – but mostly sail on a team with – grown-ups. There were boat owners such as George Griffith (who conceived the Cal 40 design) and Al Martin (a Los Angeles architect) who, if a kid wanted responsibility, let him have it. I expressed an interest in the bow and navigation, and they let me run with it.” More than 50 years ago navigators didn’t just hop aboard a boat, plug in the waypoints on the computer and let the routing algorithms take over. They needed to know how to use a sextant and dead-reckon. Navigation before the digital age wasn’t easy. The young Stan Honey, however, embraced the challenge. Navigating with a sextant in the early days of his career. Photo: Stan Honey “For a kid, that was incredible. It’s what committed me to the sport for life, that experience of responsibility and a set of skills respected by grown-ups,” Honey says. In demand Now aged 67, Stan Honey is one of ocean racing’s most famed navigators and also a highly accomplished engineer. His achievements in both racing and technical fields have earned him multiple accolades, including a place in three US halls of fame – the National Sailing Hall of Fame, the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Honey holds 30 patents (eight in navigational system design, and 22 in sports television enhancements). He has

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Yachting World

Jeremy Rogers, 1937-2022

British yacht builder Jeremy Rogers MBE, most famous for co-creating the iconic Contessa 32 and Contessa 26, has died at the age of 85 Jeremy Rogers, here sailing with his wife, Fiona. Credit: David Harding Credit: David Harding Jeremy Rogers was an esteemed designer and passionate racing sailor. He founded his eponymous boatyard in Lymington, Hampshire, in the United Kingdom. Rogers was born in September 1937, and as a child his mother evacuated him and his brothers to rural Canada during the Second World War. There they occupied themselves during snow-bound Ottawa winters building model boats. After the war the family returned to the UK, settling in Keyhaven just outside Lymington, where Jeremy and his younger brother Jonathan began sailing Cadets. He built his first dinghy at primary school, building a home-built Cadet dinghy whilst at Clayesmore School in Dorset, aged just 10. Jonathan, in an article written for the Contessa 32 owners’ association, recalled how Jeremy continued to build boats during his school years, as the only pupil allowed time off lessons and given a key to the workshop: “There were Canoes, a Planet with a sliding seat, he rebuilt several Finns as well as a number of old 1920s Austin 7s which were salvaged from scrap yards.” In Rogers’s final year at school, an Olympic sailor was brought in to oversee his building of a 505 dinghy, which Jeremy and Jonathan went on to successfully race together at Cowes. After leaving school, Rogers completed a five-year apprenticeship with esteemed wooden boat builder Jack Chippendale, before setting out on his own, opening the Jeremy Rogers boatyard in 1961, aged 23. Jeremy Rogers with the Dysca Folkboat outside Lillington House Early yachts included a Nordic Folkboat, built in a shed behind his house, and Finn and Ok dinghies. However, he soon moved into a factory and began constructing larger GRP boats, building a GRP Folkboat in 1966. This was swiftly followed by an early Contessa 26, Contessa of Wight, which took 2nd place in the 1969 Round the Island Race – a result repeated by her sistership Amarilla the following year. Contessa 26 yachts also went on to offshore success, winning

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Yachting World

Stan Honey – the thinking sailor

Stan Honey’s first ever offshore race set the tone for his career. Then a lean and mean 14-year-old racing Lasers out of the Los Angeles Yacht Club, Honey already had an interest in all things technical. In 1969 Stan Honey had the opportunity to go yacht racing, and took on the dual roles of navigator and bowman on his offshore debut, not only earning his place on the boat, but taking a seat at the adults’ table. “It was an absolutely riveting experience,” recalls Honey. “The thing I found most engaging was the ability to compete against – but mostly sail on a team with – grown-ups. There were boat owners such as George Griffith (who conceived the Cal 40 design) and Al Martin (a Los Angeles architect) who, if a kid wanted responsibility, let him have it. I expressed an interest in the bow and navigation, and they let me run with it.” More than 50 years ago navigators didn’t just hop aboard a boat, plug in the waypoints on the computer and let the routing algorithms take over. They needed to know how to use a sextant and dead-reckon. Navigation before the digital age wasn’t easy. The young Stan Honey, however, embraced the challenge. Navigating with a sextant in the early days of his career. Photo: Stan Honey “For a kid, that was incredible. It’s what committed me to the sport for life, that experience of responsibility and a set of skills respected by grown-ups,” Honey says. In demand Now aged 67, Stan Honey is one of ocean racing’s most famed navigators and also a highly accomplished engineer. His achievements in both racing and technical fields have earned him multiple accolades, including a place in three US halls of fame – the National Sailing Hall of Fame, the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Honey holds 30 patents (eight in navigational system design, and 22 in sports television enhancements). He has won the Trophée Jules Verne, which earned him the Rolex Yachtsman of the Year in 2010, and the Volvo Ocean Race in 2005/06. He navigated Comanche’s record-smashing transatlantic in 2016 –

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Yachting World

The world’s most radical yacht? Onboard Flying Nikka

Meet the world’s first foiling Maxi, Flying Nikka. Designed for Mediterranean distance racing, this 60ft spaceship is going to shake up the big boat scene, writes Toby Hodges after an exclusive first sail You might understandably mistake this futuristic craft for another America’s Cup foiler. Yet, although the aesthetics may look similar, Flying Nikka is a very different animal to the AC75s which ripped around Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf during the 2021 America’s Cup – and to anything we’ve seen before. This 60ft foiling weapon is designed to be owner-driven and compete in key maxi and long distance Mediterranean races. Flying Nikka has a keel and inherent stability as it needs to compete in displacement mode too. It also has the potential to embarrass any competitors by lifting onto its carbon foils and taking off at two to three times the speed of most other monohulls in existence. Flying Nikka is the most complex, innovative and exciting big yacht of the year – a pure speed machine, a technological and engineering goliath and a brave endeavour. It pushes the boundaries of where displacement sailing and foiling technology meet for offshore (albeit non-ocean) monohull racing. It is the vision of Italian owner Roberto Lacorte, designed by Mark Mills and constructed at King Marine in Valencia. Not only was its development impressively rapid from concept to first foiling, but it was built to a repeatable budget, around 1/10th the cost of a Cup boat. As Mills emphasises: “The core of the project was for reliable, easy foiling.” It is sailed by Lacorte and his long-standing crew, rather than Cup all-stars. And while I was admittedly sceptical about the overall purpose of Flying Nikka, I was privileged to be given an exclusive sail aboard during the team’s early trials from Punta Ala, Italy, in July. Flying Nikka looks rather Batman inspired, particularly the red leading edge of the black foils. Photo: Fabio Taccola Flying Nikka – a need for speed Roberto Lacorte, an entrepreneur, accomplished racing driver and serial yacht owner, explained how Flying Nikka materialised. His previous yacht, the Mills/Vismara 62 racer-cruiser SuperNikka, has been highly successful on the Med circuit since her

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Yachting World

Best kayak deals: Our pick of the Prime Early Access Sale bargains

The Amazon Prime Early Access Sale starts today and we’ve picked out the best kayak deals to help you bag a kayaking bargain… New for 2022, the Amazon Prime Early Access Sale (October 11-12) means that Prime members can get the kind of deals you’d expect on Black Friday, but a month early, and the inaugural sale includes several great kayak deals. Paddlers can get discounts on everything from cold water wetsuits to kayak paddles. But don’t forget, you have to be a Prime member to get these deals – if you haven’t signed up already, you can take out a 30-day free trial of Amazon Prime. Read on for our pick of the best kayak deals available during the Amazon Prime Early Access Sale event… Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence. Best US kayak deals Abahub kayak paddles Available in a choice of four sizes, ranging from 86” to 95”, these kayak paddles are made to last with aluminium shafts and fiberglass reinforced polypropylene blades. Three locking positions mean you can adjust the angle of your paddles to reduce wind resistance, while the bungee leash means there’s no risk of your new paddle being washed out to sea. This deal is only available on the first day of the Prime Early Access Sale event (October 11), so don’t hang around. Was: $89.99 Now: $23.79 View Deal Flexel 3mm full-length neoprene wetsuit A full-length wetsuit is a useful investment, particularly if you want to keep kayaking all-year-round. This option from Flexel is available in men’s and women’s versions with sizing ranging from XS to XXXL. The combination of neoprene and nylon fabrics give this wetsuit a soft and smooth texture, while the 3mm thickness means it’s suitable for water temperatures between 62-68F (16-20C). Was: $69.90 Now: $33.90 View Deal Best UK kayak deal Sevylor two-person inflatable canoe A two-person inflatable canoe from one of the best kayak brands out there – this is a Prime Early Access Deal that’s not to be missed (available on October 11 only). Two paddles

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Yachting World

Paul Larsen’s record-breaking SailRocket 2 to sail again: 10 years on

Paul Larsen’s SailRocket 2, which set the 65.45 knot speed sailing record 10 years ago, is to sail again at Weymouth this month Paul Larsen, who has held the outright speed sailing record for 10 years, has dusted off the record-breaking craft SailRocket 2 and plans to sail again out of Weymouth later this month. Larsen set the extraordinary speed record of 65.45 knots average over the 500 metre course in Walvis Bay, Namibia in November 2012. The achievement not only obliterated the existing record, but set a target that no other speed record challenger has neared since (though there are several ambitious new challenges in development hoping to nudge the bar close to an incredible 80 knots!). SailRocket 2 was built in East Cowes but launched in Namibia. It last sailed on 24 November 2012 when, on the third run of the day in 27 knot winds, Larsen piloted SailRocket 2 to her record run, averaging 65.45 knots and hitting a phenomenal top speed of 68.33 knots (78.6 mph).   Current speed record holders Paul Larsen and Vestas Sailrocket 2. Photo: Vestas SailRocket Since then the asymmetric wingsailed speed vessel has been stored in a 40ft container in  Weymouth. However, Larsen has dusted it off, re-rigged it, and will be attending Weymouth Speed Week which runs from 15-21 October 2022 at Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Centre. Larsen explained: “It’s been 50 years since the first Weymouth Speed Week was conducted here, that was 1972 and really marked the start of speed sailing. That’s when they said, alright, let’s have an event and start timing all these boats and just how fast people really are. “Those events in the early Speed Weeks went on to inspire lots of people, certainly myself included.” “This boat [SailRocket] has never sailed on UK waters, certainly never sailed here in Weymouth.  “It just seemed right on this 50th anniversary of Speed Week to get the boat out of her 40ft shipping container, set her up and just see. Try to sail this boat – just once – down this speed sailing strip over here.” Given SailRocket’s unique speeds and manoeuvrability issues, it’s not

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Yachting World

What should sailors do if they encounter migrant vessels at sea?

Ryan Ellison discovered a raft with 60 migrants adrift in the Atlantic Ocean while on a solo passage – he tells Erin Carey about the migrant vessel encounter and the rescue that followed What would you do if you came across a migrant vessel adrift at sea? It’s a scenario many sailors have discussed because, unfortunately, it’s not uncommon to find desperate migrants and refugees making treacherous crossings on overloaded, poorly constructed rafts or inflatable boats. For Ryan Ellison this scenario became a reality when he encountered 60 migrants – and became part of a mission to rescue over 300 – at night, on his first ever solo ocean crossing. Ellison and his partner, Sophie Darsy, have lived aboard their 2007 Beneteau Oceanis 40 Polar Seal for more than four years. The couple, who document their adventures online (ryanandsophie.com), have sailed around Europe from Scandinavia to southern Italy, cruised the Caribbean and Antilles, and made transatlantic crossings via the Azores and Cape Verde islands. In January this year Ellison was embarking on his first solo ocean passage, crossing the Atlantic from Lanzarote to Antigua while Sophie flew to France. It was an emotional departure for the couple, who usually sail double-handed, but Ellison was keen to push his personal limits. Ellison is no stranger to physical and mental challenges; he’s an ex-fighter jet pilot, marathon runner and mountaineering enthusiast used to handling high-stress situations. Photo: Ryan & Sophie Sailing On Monday, 24 January, he set sail towards Antigua. Just over 24 hours after departing Marina Rubicon in Lanzarote, Ellison was sailing along the eastern coast of Fuerteventura, preparing to sail through the strong acceleration winds the area is renowned for. A little after 1500 that day the winds picked up as expected, and he knew he was in for a rough second night until he reached the lee of Gran Canaria. Throughout the day on the VHF radio there were various mentions of a raft adrift. Reports of such rafts are relatively frequent in this area, as it’s a migration route from Mauritania, west Africa, to the European territories of the Canary Islands. Several yachts participating in the annual ARC

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Yachting World

World’s coolest yachts: Cal40

We ask top sailors and marine industry gurus to choose the coolest and most innovative yachts of our times. Stan Honey nominates the Cal40 The Cal40 has iconic status in the United States and was a game-changer in the 1960s as a true racer/cruiser. Designed by Bill Lapworth, it has a radical flat-bottomed hull and separate rudder and keel, and was famed for its downwind surfing performance. “The Cal40 revolutionised yacht design,” says Honey. “All ocean racers that came after had the fin keel and spade rudder that the Cal40 proved in the mid-1960s, dominating the sport including the Transpac, Bermuda Race, SORC etc. The Cal40 remains competitive in racing and an easy-to-sail, well-mannered cruising boat, perfect for a couple. A Cal40 surfing into the finish of the Transpac. Photo: Betsy Senescu/Ultimate Sailing “One aspect of owning a Cal40 is that everywhere you go folks come by the boat and tell stories about how they used to race on a Cal40 and that they love the boat. They have friends and admirers everywhere. It’s like driving a 1965 Mustang, everybody has fond memories. The Cal40 changed the design of offshore sailboats, like the ’65 Mustang changed the design of cars, forever.” Make sure you check out our full list of Coolest Yachts. Cal40 stats rating Top speed: 22 knots LOA: 11.99m/39.3ft Launched: 1963 Berths: 6 Price: $30,000-$80,000 Adrenalin factor: 70% Stan Honey Stan Honey is one of the world’s most accomplished navigators, having won the Trophée Jules Verne and Volvo Ocean Race, and set 24-hour, transpacific and transatlantic records. He’s navigated on Playstation, Groupama 3, Comanche, and the J Class Hanuman. He and his wife, Sally, also cruised and raced their Cal40 Illusion for 30 years. If you enjoyed this…. Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for bluewater cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we have inspirational adventures and practical features to help you realise your sailing dreams. Build your knowledge with a subscription delivered to your door. See our latest offers and save at least 30% off the cover price. The post World’s coolest yachts: Cal40 appeared first on Yachting World.

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Yachting World

Changing robes: 8 of the best dry robes for outdoor swimmers

Get cosy before and after your next swimming session with a warm and weatherproof changing robe, ideal for open water swimmers, triathletes, surfers and winter dippers. Swimming, paddleboarding, triathlon, surfing, sailing – however you love to get out and enjoy the water, when temperatures drop, there’s one thing that can make water sports and swimming more comfortable – a great changing robe. The best change robe is, as the name suggests, designed for use on shore, to make wriggling into a wetsuit before a swim or pulling your clothes back on after a surf less of a faff (and to help you avoid flashing the whole car park). Changing robes have another use, though – a fleece-lined robe is ideal for warming up fast after cold water swim. Insulated, waterproof changing robes are ideal if you’re an all-year-round swimmer, stopping you from losing precious body heat, especially if you’re swimming in ‘skins’ (swimsuit only). Meanwhile, you’ll also find lightweight, towelling-style robes available which are ideal for warmer weather. Use these so you can get changed on the beach or by a lake easily, or pop them on to dry off with, instead of a towel. Note that you should never wear a changing robe while on the water, such as when on a paddleboard, as they present a risk of drowning if you accidentally fall in – save them for before or after your swim. Changing robes come in lots of designs, but some are so smart and stylish you could easily wear them as a coat, which makes a nice versatile option for daily use in the winter. You’ll more bang for your buck if you invest in a changing robe that you can also wear to walk the dog or do the school run when it’s foul outside. Our top six picks of the best dry robes for women and men are perfect for swimming in in every season. We’ve included lightweight toweling robes, packable waterproof robes and fashion-forward robes you can also wear as a coat. Not sure where to start shopping? You’ll also find key features to look out for when choosing your new swimming change

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