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Yachting World

Great seamanship: Scarborough to Brightlingsea

Tom Cunliffe introduces an extract from Albert Strange’s early corinthian cruising account of sailing from Scarborough to Brightlingsea, a trip which was not without its challenges. The Edwardian period of English yachting is best remembered for the great cutters and schooners of the racing scene. From Cowes to the Clyde professionally crewed yachts competed for big-money prizes while fortunes changed hands by way of wagers on results. Albert Strange, Yacht Designer and Artist by John Leather. Lodestar Books, £20 But while this extravagant scene raced on, another world was unfolding. Corinthian cruising, in boats small enough to be single-handed – or at least sailed without paid men in the fo’c’sle – was slowly coming of age. With it arose a new breed of amateur and semi-professional designers, and many of their craft are still sailing today. Among them are designs from Albert Strange, the son of a shopkeeper who dreamed of the sea and made it happen, becoming an enthusiastic member of the famous Humber Yawl Club in 1891. He was a trained artist and a notable writer with a delicious turn of phrase. In this rollicking account Strange is sailing Cherub II, a 22ft centre-plate yacht from his own drawing board. He describes part of a singular cruise from Scarborough in Yorkshire to Brightlingsea in Essex. Having ducked inland via the Humber, he is now on his way to the Wash by way of the river and canal system and is confronting an apparently insurmountable obstacle… On the banks of the river were many anglers, doubtless enjoying the weather as being the most propitious for their gentle art, and far off awaited us the ruined lock at Bardney and the unsolved problem as to how to get through it. The very faintest of airs gave us bare steerageway, and it was noon before we finally reached the problem which it was necessary to solve or else retrace our way to Grimsby. Yes, alas and as foretold, the lock was totally shut up, bolted and barred by big balks of timber. The lock keeper came out and looked at us, shook his head, and said he thought we should have to

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Yachting World

SailGP: Stunning opening weekend hails return of series

High winds on the second day of racing for the SailGP season opener saw thrills spills and a surprise win. The event could hardly have been a better advert for the season to come Photo: Bob Martin / SailGP Sir Ben Ainslie’s British team took the opening victory in an action-packed SailGP in Bermuda, which saw close racing, collisions, capsizes and more as the eight foiling F50 catamarans fought it out in five fleet races and a final winner-takes-all race. The opening weekend of SailGP season 2 looked set, for much of the weekend, to continue where the first season left off, with season 1 champions, Tom Slingsby’s Team Australia, the clear standout performer over the weekend of racing in Bermuda. Slingsby and his team took an impressive four wins over the course of the weekend. However, when it really mattered, Sir Ben Ainslie’s Great Britain SailGP Team took the final win of the weekend and in so doing were crowned event winners. With his team of Luke Parkinson, Iain Jensen, Matt Gotrel, Neil Hunter and Richard Mason, Ainslie managed to sail past the Aussies in the final podium race to win by just four seconds, claiming his place at the top of the season leaderboard. The Brits had a disappointing first day of the regatta , finishing the opening day in sixth place of the eight boat fleet. But with racing designed to be decided on the final race, the event is simply a case of doing enough to qualify for the final race and it is anyone’s game from there. Of the thrilling final Ainslie said: “It was a cracking race. It was awesome. It’s what we want to do it for; go against the top sailors in the world in conditions like this – it was perfect. It was a huge credit to the team, we really struggled yesterday, but we analysed what went wrong and today was a much better day and I am delighted with the result, it’s a great way to start the season. Slingsby said: “It was a great race. We feel a little hard done by, as we sailed so well all

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Yachting World

Cowes-Dinard record: Two trimaran records in hours

Two trimarans each set a new record in the space of 4 minutes, as a staggered start attempt at the Cowes-Dinard course saw a new record set twice A MOD70 and Multi70 trimaran both set out on Thursday 22 April in an attempt to break the Cowes-Dinard course record in what was billed as a match race for the record. The blast across the channel certainly lived up to its billing as Peter Cunningham’s MOD70 PowerPlay (who set a new Fastnet course record recently) set an unofficial world record for the Cowes-Dinard Course initially, but for the Hamble-based team, the euphoria was short-lived as the later-starting Multi70, Maserati crossed the finish with an eve better time. Photo: Rick Tomlinson PowerPlay completed the 138-mile course Cowes-Dinard Course in an unofficial time of 04 hrs 34 mins 06 secs, well inside the official world record. However, Giovanni Soldini’s Maserati completed their run in an unofficial time of 4 hrs 30 mins 49 secs, just 3 minutes and 17 seconds faster than PowerPlay. Both teams recorded boat speeds in excess of 40 knots, at an average speed in excess of 30 knots. To put the amazing pace into context, PowerPlay’s Tom Dawson quipped that the Portsmouth to St Malo ferry takes seven hours! “Fantastic, the sun is shining, and we broke the record, but unfortunately for us, Maserati broke it too!” commented Peter Cunningham. “We hit a top speed of 43 knots with Ned (Collier Wakefield) on the helm and SiFi (Simon Fisher) was making sure we stayed on course for the record. “We buried the leeward hull a couple of times, so the amount of spray was enormous! Paul Larsen took the helm coming into the finish and pushed us really hard, it was fantastic. We did have to put in a couple of gybes in The Solent and we had an issue with the reefing, I guess that cost us time.” “Why do I do it – How else can you break a world record at 80 years old?” continued Peter. “It is an incredible feeling of accomplishment for the crew. When the boat is in the groove and takes off, screaming

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Yachting World

What we learned from our Pip Hare Ask Me Anything on YBW

Vendée Globe racer and Yachting World contributor, Pip Hare answers YBW forum members’ questions in our second ever Ask Me Anything session. #EN# LES SABLES D’OLONNE, FRANCE – FEBRUARY 12: Skipper Pip Hare (UK), Medallia, is pictured celebrating with flares in the channel during arrival of the Vendee Globe sailing race, on February 12, 2021. (Photo by Jean-Louis Carli/Alea) #FR# LES SABLES D’OLONNE, FRANCE – 12 FEVRIER: La skipper Pip Hare, Medallia, est photographiée célébrant avec des feux à main dans le chenal lors de son arrivée du Vendee Globe, le 12 Février 2021. (Photo Jean-Louis Carli/Alea) On April 22nd, Vendée Globe hero and the first British sailor to finish the 2020/21 solo non stop round the world race, Pip Hare was our second special guest in a new series of Ask Me Anything sessions on the YBW forum. Here’s a few of the insights Pip shared… Life after the Vendée Globe Many of the YBW forum members were interested in Pip’s future plans, whether she would be aiming for another Vendée and if so on what boat. ‘The big goal is Vendée 2024, but there is a lot to do in the meantime,’ Pip Hare wrote. ‘I am looking forward to club racing on Thursday nights in Poole, hopefully the 3 Peaks Yacht Race this year, the Round The Island Race and then the IMOCA Globe Series. ‘I was chartering Superbigou [renamed Medallia after her title sponsor for the duration of the race] and the charter has come to an end, so I delivered it back to France and that is the end of this chapter. I hope the boat will go on to some more adventures. It’s a boat with a beautiful history.’ When asked if she had a yacht in mind for the next edition of the Vendée Globe Pip replied that she has, but said ‘That is all you will get out of me today!’ The Vendée experience for Pip Hare The Vendée Globe is a unique event and even taking part in the race is a rare feat. Those that actually finish the race –which usually sees at least half the fleet unable to finish

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Yachting World

Autonomous boats: The rise of self-sailing vessels

Sam Fortescue reports on the latest developments in autonomous boats and self-sailing technology, which is ready to be deployed in a variety of uses from weather monitoring to shipping ‘Vessel not under command’ looks set to take on a new meaning, with the race to develop a new generation of autonomous boats sailed by artificial intelligence (AI). But what will it mean for other water users? Today we’re all familiar with the concept of autonomous vehicles. Self-driving cars are the next development frontier, and the tools needed to make them a reality are being intensively tested by some of Silicon Valley’s biggest tech firms. Less well known is the similar trajectory being followed in the marine industry. So-called unmanned autonomous vehicles, or marine drones, are attracting research interest from everyone from backyard inventors up to engineering behemoths like Rolls-Royce. They come in all shapes and sizes, with intended purposes varying from meteorology and oceanology, to cargo, surveillance and defence. From the outside, some resemble normal sailing multihulls. You might never realise there is no human aboard Artemis Technologies’ self-sailing cat, for example, with its 50-knot top speed. The Belfast-based company has based its design for a 45m-long Autonomous Sailing Vehicle (ASV) on technology developed for the 2017 America’s Cup. Artemis Technologies’ autonomous boat design is based on the 2017 America’s Cup catamaran. Photo: Artemis Technologies With two fixed wing sails, the catamaran rises up on four foils and hits top speed in just 20 knots of wind. Regenerating propellers on two of the foils charge a large battery bank on board, and that harvesting of energy brings the boat speed back down to 30 knots. In lighter 8-knot winds, the boat still foils at 20 knots, and electric motors spin propellers that bump the speed back up to its optimum 30 knots. Artemis believes it can be used as a constant-speed commercial vessel for delivering cargo. Meanwhile, in Plymouth, a consortium including IBM is testing a new Mayflower, a 15m power trimaran studded with solar panels, that should be capable of operating independently for months at a time. It has a top speed of 10 knots achieved with an electric

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Yachting World

Battling to Hobart: Memories of the Sydney Hobart

The Rolex Sydney Hobart Race has its own mythology, as Andrew Wilson finds out from those who’ve done it. Tom Cunliffe introduces this extract from Blue Water Classics, Portaits of the Sydney Hobart Yacht Race Discovering Andrew Wilson has been the sort of exciting surprise that comes with editing a column like Great Seamanship. Andrew is a photographer working in Tasmania. He knows yacht and boat seafaring from keel to truck and is quick to point out that the weather in his part of the world, which he describes as the ‘Roaring Forties’, generally changes every five minutes. Blue Water Classics, Portraits of the Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, by Andrew Wilson This lavish new volume, Blue Water Classics, Portaits of the Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, is an absolute must-have for all ocean racing fans, revealing through interviews the feelings of the event’s greatest participants. The extract below is the interview with Ian ‘Barney’ Walker from Melbourne, a true Southern Ocean warrior and one of those supremely versatile professional sailors who seem to excel in all areas of the competitive scene, having campaigned in three Whitbread/Volvo round the world races, two America’s Cups, three Olympic keelboat events and 32 Sydney Hobart Races, including three overall victories. In the book, this redoubtable mariner discusses the ‘Hobart’ challenge from the perspective of very different boats, then goes on to tell us how it is when you’re going well in a flying machine until the swing keel falls off… At the level of boats I’ve been dealing with for the last 20 years it’s been an incredible challenge for me to get the crew together, to race the boat at 100%, 100% of the time. It’s not an easy job to do, but it’s what’s required these days to win the race. You must have an up-to-date boat, a boat that can plane; it’s an incredibly quick race now. I was on Nokia when we beat the two-day record – 1 day, 19h 48m 2s in 1999. The supermaxis have [since] cut that down to just over 1 day, 9h. The boats have changed, and the standard of competition and the level of the

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Yachting World

Jean Le Cam: Vendée Globe legend they call ‘The King’

Jean Le Cam was already a legend, now he’s the undisputed hero of the Vendée Globe, having massively outperformed his boat in the last edition of the race and making an incredible mid-ocean rescue of fellow competitor, Kevin Escoffier, writes Ed Gorman He’s the solo skipper who might remind you of Keith Richards. A rugged, hawkish face topped off with an unruly mop of black curly hair, Jean Le Cam was the rockstar of this year’s Vendée Globe. When he finished, he danced, fists pumping the air, to French rocker Johnny Hallyday played loud as he made his way up the channel of Les Sables d’Olonne. Appearing on the race’s live video calls, Le Cam updated his fans with a self-conscious grin and the famous twinkle in his eye. “Clack, clack, clack,” he would mutter, mimicking the rotating camera as it spun to show outside his beautifully optimised IMOCA 60 (which he refers to as ‘Hubert’). “Why are you looking at me?” he demanded in his gravelly voice, scowling into the lens. ‘The King’, as he is known, surprised a lot of people by running in the top 10 all the way around the world and then finishing 4th overall in his fifth Vendée Globe. That’s because, at 61, Jean Le Cam was the oldest skipper in the fleet and his daggerboard-configured boat (the 2008 Farr design that Michel Desjoyeaux won with in 2009) was not one of the latest foiling models. Jean Le Cam sets out at the start of the 2020/21 Vendée Globe aboard his IMOCA 60 YES WE CAM! Photo: Jean-Marie Liot/Alea/YES WE CAM But those who know him were not in the least bit surprised. What they saw was the evergreen Breton legend bringing his usual ingredients to bear: immaculate preparation, a racecourse he had encountered four times before (solo, as well as double-handed and crewed round the worlds) and self-confidence in his own ability, born of a 40-year career at the top of professional ocean racing. Jean Le Cam earned his ‘King’ nickname thanks to his utter domination of the Solitaire du Figaro circuit 20 years ago, which he won three times. He is one

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Yachting World

SailGP: All you need to know about the 2021 season

SailGP is now in its second season, with some of the best sailors in the world, sailing some of the fastest boats, going head-to-head in a global sailing series with a prize of $1m When Larry Ellison and Russell Coutts launched SailGP back in 2018, the plan was that, by 2021, the series would be heading into its third consecutive season and starting to build some serious momentum. As with the rest of the sporting world, however, COVID-19 has caused some significant disruption. The first season of SailGP racing showed the potential of the ambitious circuit, with spectacular racing at events like Cowes and Marseilles over the summer of 2019. But the second season barely got off the ground with just a single event completed – at Sydney in January 2020 – before the global pandemic and consequent lockdown forced organisers and teams to hit the pause button. 2021 will now see a proper second season of the racing, with more teams, more venues and an increased gender balance among the sailing teams. Photo: David Gray for SailGP What is SailGP? SailGP came about after the 2017 America’s Cup between Ellison’s Team Oracle USA and Emirates Team New Zealand. During the Bermuda America’s Cup there had been much discussion about creating an America’s Cup World Series in foiling catamarans, a discussion led by Ellison and supported by most of the Challengers. But when Emirates Team New Zealand delivered their shock win in 2017, they instead announced a return to monohulls for Cup racing (the spectacular AC75s raced in Auckland this year). Ellison, boss of technology giant Oracle, and Russell Coutts, a five-times America’s Cup winner, decided to launch a brand new multi-stage global circuit in foiling catamarans: Sail GP. Ellison is understood to have wholly funded the circuit for the first three years. The intention was that, as the circuit grew and gained more television exposure, other commercial backers would come onboard. The new racing circuit was announced with much fanfare and a $1m prize purse for each season. The series rules also featured tight nationality rules – at the time tighter than for the America’s Cup itself – albeit

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Yachting World

Superyacht Cup Palma set to return for 25th anniversary regatta

The organisers of the Superyacht Cup Palma have confirmed that the 2021 regatta will be going ahead, with a new-look event that will comply with local pandemic restrictions Photo: SYC / Sailing Energy Racing will take place in the Bay of Palma from June 23-26, with the shoreside venue relocating to Real Club Nautico De Palma. Last year’s cancellation hasn’t dented the interest from owners and skippers, quite the opposite, with the 25th anniversary of Europe’s longest-running superyacht regatta already attracting provisional entries from 14 superyachts ranging from 24-27m. Standout yachts include the 46m Dubois-designed Ganesha, set for a return in the Superyacht Class, while the lightweight 30m WallyCento Magic Carpet3 is a possible contender in the Performance Class. Also eyeing a return is the 40m modern classic ketch Huckleberry, who won the inaugural North Sails Trophy in 2019. “We had a great time at our first ever Superyacht Cup Palma and we have been eagerly awaiting the opportunity to repeat the experience,” said Huckleberry captain Carlos Potier. “This year the event will of course be a bit different, but the sailing weather is reliable and the racing out in Palma Bay is always outstanding, so we are counting the days to the start.” In addition, entries from the J-Class fleet are seen as a distinct possibility, with owners, captains and crews perhaps inspired by Velsheda’s narrow but fully deserved overall victory in 2018, when they held off a determined challenge from the superketch Mari-Cha III. Should three or more J-Class yachts compete they will be given their own racing class. What’s more, 2021 will see the debut of the Superyacht Cup Performance Class. Featuring a competitive fleet start and racing on a separate course, the new Performance Class will join the long-standing original Superyacht Class and the non-spinnaker Corinthian Superyacht Class. “We know there is a yearning for competitive sailing after what has of course been a challenging time for everyone,” said event director Kate Branagh. “By keeping the focus out on the water, we know we can meet all local pandemic restrictions, keep owners, skippers, crews and our partners safe, and deliver exciting superyacht racing on what will be

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Yachting World

First look: Trintella 45 and 50 – classic yard reborn

Rupert Holmes reports on a pair of new German Frers designed yachts, both of which are contemporary designs with a classic aesthetic: the elegant Trintella 45 and 50 These two gorgeous German Frers designs offer an enticing blend of contemporary yacht design with classic elegance. The Trintella 45 and 50 are intended to re-establish the Trintella brand, echoing the timeless style of the original yachts, including their trademark varnished coamings and coachroof sides. Yet they’re bang up to date in every other respect. The Dutch yard was synonymous with quality boatbuilding and cutting-edge design for more than 40 years until it closed 18 years ago. During the rise of production boatbuilding in the 1950s and ’60s founder Anne Wever was quicker than his competitors to adopt new technologies, yet he also had a traditionalist’s eye for perfection. The result was beautiful yachts that were fitted-out to a very high standard and his yard quickly became one of the most successful in Europe. Arguably no one is better placed to revive the name than Joop Doomernik. He grew up sailing at the club next to Wever’s yard in ’s-Hertogenbosch, restored a 29ft Dragon keelboat at the age of 16, and then went on to become an apprentice at Trintella. For the past 30 years Doomernik has run his own yard less than 10 miles away, undertaking classic yacht restorations, as well as building exquisite Wally Nanos and competitive Dragons. Article continues below… First look: Brooklin Boat Yard / Jim Taylor 44 The Brooklin Boat Yard in Maine is a giant in New England’s Spirit of Tradition scene. Once again they are… First look: J/45, Solaris 60, and Linjett 39 Manufacturers are continuing to design and build innovative new boats in 2021. This month, we’re looking at three new yachts… Nevertheless Doomernik told me it was difficult to define the real Trintella DNA: “I did a lot of thinking, and talked to Trintella owners, before reaching the conclusion that the underlying philosophy is of a high-end gentleman’s yacht,” he says. “Maybe the owner doesn’t even want light displacement with high speed, but instead wants comfort, quality and that feeling you get when

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