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Yachting World

Round the world races: 3 new budget events

With adventure and endurance racing still on the up, particularly in the world of amateur yachting, three new races are due to be launched in the coming year as the boom continues Sea Dragon is a former BT Challenge round the world racing yacht that has been refitted for use conducting ocean research A clutch of ‘budget friendly’ new round the world races for sailor-owners has tapped into renewed enthusiasm for adventure and endurance sailing. All three new events are set to take off in 2023. The Global Solo Race non-stop single handed round the world race, planned for 2023, has already attracted 12 entries. It is organised by Italian sailor Marco Nannini, who took part in Josh Hall’s Global Ocean Race for Class 40s in 2011, and set up the Global Solo Race with Hall. A fleet of 18 yachts left Les Sables d’Olonne for the Golden globe recreation race on 1 July 2018. Photo: Christophe Favreau / PPL / GGR The race is open to monohulls from 32-55ft with an IRC rating below 1.25. The skippers entered so far are aged between 35 and 67 and are from Belgium, Switzerland, UK, Netherlands, France, Italy and Bulgaria with yachts ranging from an S&S 34 to a Farr 45. Another event in the offing is the Race Around, a round the world race for Class 40s. Unlike the Global Solo Race, this is a multi-stage circumnavigation that will stop in Cape Town, New Zealand and Rio before returning to Europe to a finish possibly in the UK. Phil Sharp racing his Class 40 The Race Around is being organised by Sam Holliday and Hugh Piggin, who both have roots in the Class 40 scene. They have recently added a solo section to the event to run alongside the double-handed class. The Race Around seeks to attract high level sailors already active in Mini 6.50s, Figaros or Class 40s and to bridge the gulf that exists between these more affordable classes and the multi-million budgets of the IMOCA 60s that race in the Vendée Globe. A third race to watch out for is Don Macintyre’s retro Ocean Globe Race, also due

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Yachting World

How to prepare a boat for the season ahead

Abby Ehler gives her advice and top tips on how to prepare a boat for the season ahead, from planning for the worst, to defining your goals, having a checklist for the start of the season is essential. Abby Ehler has competed in three Volvo Ocean Races and run top race boats including Farr 40s, TP52s and the 76ft mini-maxi Nokia Enigma. She has also been a key player in shoreside management for the America’s Cup and SailGP. So there are few people in a better position to understand what it takes to prepare a boat and crew for the season ahead.  Ehler says she ‘fell into’ the world of boat captaining, but was delighted to discover she had a natural aptitude for it. “I enjoy the elements of boat captaining because it requires a lot of attention to detail, high levels of organisation and logistics. So I guess it’s not everyone’s cup of tea, but it works to my strengths,” she explains. Even if this part of campaigning is something you put off, rather than relish, these tips from Ehler will get you on the right path to prepare a boat more efficiently and with much greater reliability. Define your timeline Identify the event where you want to be operating at your absolute peak and work out how many days, weeks and months you have before then. Once you’ve got your timeframe, split up the areas of work: rigging, winches and deck hardware, sails, the bottom of the boat, and mast. Highlight your key dates, eg the date the mast goes in or boat launches in the water. Those deadlines will govern doing all your mast and associated rigging jobs, making sure that’s all checked and ready prior to that set date. Likewise on the day the boat is launched you want to make sure your underwater surfaces, rudder bearings, and any underwater elements such as depth sounders have all been ticked off before the boat gets wet. Sea trial first As soon as the boat launches, you can guarantee the job list will increase tenfold. Then add crew into the mix, and the list will increase again. This is

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Yachting World

Pip Hare gets ‘dream’ foiling IMOCA for 2024 Vendée Globe

British solo skipper Pip Hare announces title sponsorship and a foiling IMOCA for the 2024 Vendée Globe British Vendée Globe sailor Pip Hare today announced that she has renewed her partnership with Medallia, and bought a foiling IMOCA for her 2024 Vendée Globe campaign. The news will delight fans of the solo sailor, who began her 2020 Vendée Globe campaign with no title backer and a tiny budget. She went on to secure American software company Medallia as a sponsor just months ahead of the start, before delivering an incredible race in one of the oldest boats in the fleet. Pip’s determination and ability to share the challenges as well as the sheer enjoyment of racing Medallia in the last Vendee Globe won her legions of fans. Today’s announcement that Pip Hare has sponsorship nearly four years ahead of the next Vendee Globe gives her a valuable full cycle time frame over which to plan her new IMOCA campaign, and a clear jump-start on other skippers facing years of searching for funding. Article continues below… Pip Hare: My Vendée Globe journey The Vendée Globe race was everything I ever dreamed it could be, and more. It challenged me every day, it… Ask Pip Hare: Vendee skipper answers Yachting World reader questions Direct from the middle of the Atlantic, Vendée Globe competitor, Pip Hare, exclusively answers questions by Yachting World readers on… Pip said: “Medallia and I have had a fantastic partnership over the last year – they made a huge difference to my 2020/21 Vendee Globe race when they joined my campaign just five months before the start of the race. So having them with me now, at the very start of my 2024 campaign is brilliant – their support has given me the chance to secure the boat that will take me round the world in about three years’ time. “I’m now determined to spend those years training, upgrading and finessing and I can’t wait to see what Medallia and I will achieve together in the lead up to the next Vendee.” Bureau Vallée 2 was sailed by French skipper Louis Burton to 3rd in the 2020/21 Vendée Globe. Photo

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Yachting World

Join Toby Hodges for expert advice in ‘Bluewater cockpit conversations’ this May

Yachting World’s Toby Hodges is among the experts sharing their advice in a new series of Bluewater Cockpit Conversations from ARC organisers World Cruising Club Kraken founder Dick Beaumont at White Dragon’s wheel chatting to YW’s Toby Hodges ARC rally organisers World Cruising Club are running a unique series of events from 25-28 May, which should be essential watching for any aspiring bluewater cruisers looking to buy a yacht or make the leap to liveaboard life. The event will be called ARC Bluewater Cockpit Conversations and will feature Yachting World‘s own Toby Hodges. Bluewater Cockpit Conversations, will be forums held online and will gather previous ARC skippers, yacht surveyors, brokers and refit specialists to share their expert advice. Toby Hodges, Yachting World‘s boat test editor, will be among those passing on expertise on how to choose the right yacht for you, and there are also sessions on buying and refitting a yacht, as well as inspiration on amazing places to cruise from couples who have done just that. Jeremy Wyatt from ARC organisers World Cruising Club explains further: “I am often asked by aspiring bluewater cruisers ‘what is the right boat for the ARC?’. This is a very broad topic and it is not easy to give a short answer. So instead we’ve brought together a cross-section of experienced bluewater cruisers and industry experts to share their knowledge and help people focus on what will be right for them and their style of sailing. “We know from previous live events held with our partners at Berthon International Yacht Brokers, that people really enjoy the chance to hop-aboard our open-boats and have face-to-face conversations with our ARC skippers and industry experts. This year we are creating a virtual cockpit and inviting curious cruisers out there to grab a seat and enjoy our special cockpit conversations.” A record number of boats are expected to cross with the ARC in 2021/22 Expert advice The ARC Bluewater Cockpit Conversations is a free to attend event running over four consecutive evenings from 25-28 May. Each will feature a theme, with different skippers and industry experts in the Cockpit to chat and answer live questions from

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Watch – Dengue in the Americas

Dengue is a risk in many parts of Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Some countries are reporting increased numbers of cases of the disease. Travelers to the Americas can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites.
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Yachting World

Nordic Cool 105: First look

‘Nordic cool’ is the term that has been given to this new 105ft semi-custom superyacht from Southern Wind. She’s the fifth 105 to be launched, but what sets her apart? Sam Fortescue takes a look Yacht number five in Southern Wind’s 105ft semi-custom line is set to have a raised saloon, like several of her sisterships. But the lines and geometry have been slightly modified to give the yacht a sportier look. Always designed as a strong performer, as the involvement of Farr Yacht Design shows, this latest boat has been supercharged. The hull, deck and bulkheads are all full carbon, the deck is light synthetic teak, and the stanchions and deck gear are in titanium. The keel is a telescopic model. The objective is a yacht that displaces under 70 tonnes and can sail fast even in light airs. The look and feel of the boat has been termed ‘Nordic cool’, and Nauta has teamed up with Dutch designer Jeroen Machielsen to deliver an interior that fits the concept. There is room aboard to garage a 4.6m Williams jet tender, as well as toys including paddleboards, diving gear and even a pair of road bikes. Specifications: LOA: 32.27m / 105ft 11inLWL: 29.44m / 96ft 7inBeam: 7.31m / 24ft 0inDraught: 3.65m-5.60m / 12ft 0in-18ft 4inDisplacement: 69,500kg / 153,220lbBuilder: sws-yachts.com If you enjoyed this…. Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for bluewater cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we have inspirational adventures and practical features to help you realise your sailing dreams. Build your knowledge with a subscription delivered to your door. See our latest offers and save at least 30% off the cover price. The post Nordic Cool 105: First look appeared first on Yachting World.

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Yachting World

Best sailing thermal: baselayers for year-round warmth

Still feeling the chill on the water? Perhaps you want something to keep you warm on a long overnight passage. A good sailing thermal base layer is essential, say Toby Hodges and Rupert Holmes Crewing can offer unbeatable life experiences at relatively little cost. Photo: Tor Johnson A technical base layer or sailing thermal is the foundation of any layering system. It adds warmth and comfort for minimal bulk. While some elite athlete sailors may grind winches all day long, the majority of us who sail in weather cool enough to warrant wearing a base layer are static a lot of the time when afloat and will benefit from a thermal insulating layer. Base layers are designed to transfer/wick moisture away from the skin and in some cases to create a layer of insulation and warmth (hence the name thermals). Wicking works by capillary action from the skin to the exterior surface, so to achieve this base layers need to be tight fitting. A good long-sleeved base layer and trousers has long been my first garment to pack for cold weather sailing. I also wear these performance base layers for exercise from running to skiing, and through the colder winter months working in my ‘office’ – believe me, days spent in a poorly insulated shed can be as unforgiving as long stints on the rail. Sailing base layers are typically made from synthetic fibres, such as polyester, which is good for wicking and durability, or polypropylene, known for its hydrophobic and thermal properties. Natural fibres such as merino wool and bamboo have also become a popular choice. Merino is naturally insulating and breathable, is soft against the skin and doesn’t pick up odours as quickly as man made materials. However, it is more expensive than polyester and takes longer to dry. Most sailing clothing brands now offer both natural and synthetic base layers or a composite of both, so it’s easy to find something that suits you. Cotton should be avoided as a technical layer as it absorbs moisture which then cools and makes you feel cold. Best for light weight and exercise HH Lifa Stripe Helly Hansen brought performance

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Yachting World

Cruise Scotland: A couple finds empty anchorages and peace

Phil Johnson and his wife Roxy bought Sonder in 2019. The pair crossed the Atlantic last summer and when Covid hit, decided to cruise Scotland in the autumn The warble call from a loon broke the silence as we edged closer to shore, motoring quietly through still water. Astern, mountain peaks glowing purple in the sunset faded into the sea. Off our bow, tidal rocks marked the entrance of a cosy lagoon we’d soon be anchored in, just before the crisp evening air settled around our yacht Sonder as we continued to explore in our hasty plan to cruise Scotland. The bay was shadowed by sheer cliffs of dark volcanic rock, now in silhouette, that thrust high above our mast top, reaching 1,000ft in places. This was Scotland in the autumn, during a global pandemic, and we were all alone. My wife, Roxy, and I are both in our early 30s and run a small e-commerce business remotely while living on our Cheoy Lee Pedrick 47 Sonder. In August, we sailed across the Atlantic from Massachusetts, with the goal of cruising the warm waters of the Mediterranean, but with European COVID travel restrictions still in place, we opted instead to winter in the UK. This change in plans set off a chain reaction of spontaneous decisions; the first being an idea to cruise Scotland ‘while the weather was good’. However, it was now the beginning of October, and local sailors we shared our cruising plans with responded uniformly: “The sailing season is already well over!” Their advice resonated as we sat in our chilly, damp cabin listening to sheets of rain on deck while docked in Belfast. Sonder has spent her life in warm water without a diesel heater, which is a problem since Scotland’s northern latitude nearly matches that of Greenland. As we hurried to install a heater, friends docked alongside us with European passports tossed their lines and departed for a course south, chasing the waning sun. Tempting though their plan was, we instead turned Sonder left, sailing into steep chop that slapped her bulwarks as we pushed north out of the Irish Sea. ‘Turning left’ for Scotland

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Yachting World

Mid-ocean repairs: Vendée Globe sailors tell all

When planning an ocean passage, how do you ensure you can keep going no matter what? Rupert Holmes finds out what Vendée Globe Skippers can teach us about mid-ocean repairs Some of the damage we saw at the Vendée Globe finish was simply staggering, yet this edition was also remarkable for its small number of retirements. Many boats suffered major issues, yet kept racing until the very end thanks to mid-ocean repairs undertaken by many skippers. The first boat home, Charlie Dalin’s Apivia, gave a foretaste. We knew he’d damaged the port foil system south of Australia, but few were prepared for the sight of his boat when he approached the finish, showing the foil supported by improvised stays Dalin had needed to repeatedly adjust and maintain for 13,000 miles and 44 days. As Dalin crossed the line, 90 miles to the west Boris Herrmann was dealing with a broken shroud after the bottom splice tore open in his collision with a trawler. Dalin’s improvised porthand foil stays. Photo: Olivier Blanchet/Alea Next home after Dalin was Louis Burton, who told us the hardest thing for him had been the mid-ocean repairs and “constant DIY on the boat.” Burton was dogged by pilot and electronic problems, rigging and halyard issues, loss of the watermaker, and even damage caused by a fire. These three boats were not particularly unlucky – almost every boat that reached the finish had to overcome major technical problems at some point. But what’s remarkable about many of the repairs is they were not short-term get-you-home lash-ups – they allowed the boat to be pushed in full race mode for tens of thousands of miles. We spoke to the skippers to find out what ocean cruising sailors could learn from the race. Solve problems before you go The Vendée skippers’ extraordinary ability to solve technical problems and complete mid-ocean repairs is the outcome of a process that starts early in each campaign. Everyone I spoke to highlighted the extent to which preparation has improved across the fleet over the past few editions, including among the low-budget teams. At the top level, teams are also continuously finding better ways

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Yachting World

First look: Project Fly

The new Bill Dixon designed Project Fly promises to be a sailing superyacht with motoryacht appeal packed with creature comforts and top-end features Bill Dixon has bags of experience in designing motor yachts, and the team brought this to the fore when they sat down to pen a sailing concept around the 100ft mark. As they got into the design, it expanded until it came to rest at 121ft/37m LOA. The aim was to offer the sort of comforts and features you might find aboard a 100ft motor yacht and appeal to a broader clientele. “It was felt that at this length they could offer the volume and comfort that many customers aspire to without losing the yacht’s intimacy,” says Anders Berg, Dixon Yacht Design partner. “We have carried ‘beam max’ aft, which yields hull form stability – more capacity to carry sail without additional ballast, and a wider accommodation block aft, which really benefits the owner’s cabin.” This is primarily a comfortable cruising yacht, with all the features you’d want to see, including a large beach terrace aft with direct access from the owner’s suite, a flybridge lounging area and an open-plan saloon. There’s also a forward cockpit and three further double cabins. Handling should be relatively simple, as the team has eschewed flashy technology for a more pragmatic approach. “Although her moderate sail area/displacement ratio will certainly reward the helm, she is a cruising yacht that will perform comfortably while providing excellent interior volume and ample ‘lifestyle’ deck space.” This project is designed to be built in a flax composite, rather than aluminium, so there is less structural clutter to chip away at the volume, which reaches 200 gross tons. The flax, meanwhile, is a nod at environmental awareness, saving the carbon emissions associated with glassfibre. “We have a duty to make more environmental considerations, which has been the motivation to incorporate this product,” explains Berg. Specifications:LOA: 36.95m 121ft 3inBeam: 8.45m 27ft 9inDraught: 4.00m 13ft 1inDisplacement: 158 tonnesSail area: 671m2 7,222ft2 (upwind)Builder: dixonyachtdesign.com If you enjoyed this…. Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for bluewater cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we have inspirational adventures and practical

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Yachting World

The offshore skills you need to be bluewater ready

What are the skills you need before casting off on a transocean or bluewater adventure? Offshore training skippers share their advice You might have a departure day circled red in the diary and be furiously working through a to-do list to get there. Or maybe you’re considering a bluewater sailing adventure in future, and starting to think through the preparations you need to make. You might even have postponed your big trip, and be considering how to make the most of an extra sailing season at home. Either way, in between the jobs lists of boat upgrades and household admin and everything else, it can be easy to overlook one area of preparation: yourself. How ready, really, are you? Are there skills or areas of knowledge you and your partner or crew could work on? Would some coaching or additional experience boost your confidence? Now, with a lot of people’s sailing plans in hiatus, could be just the time to learn. Learning to anticipate the weather conditions leads to more relaxed sailing, says 59° North’s Andy Schell. Photo: 59° North Sailing Regardless of whether you followed an RYA/ASA training pathway or similar, or have learnt through time on the water and poring over books and YouTube tutorials, some bluewater skills just can’t be practised until you have to do it for real. Anchoring in coral, for example, is a hard situation to replicate. Nevertheless, there are a small number of specialist training providers who offer skills coaching specifically for sailors who are preparing for bluewater sailing and ocean sailing. We asked these hugely experienced training skippers which skills they think are worth focusing on. Beyond your comfort zone Amanda and John Neal have run Mahina Expeditions for over 30 years, offering onboard teaching courses, as as well seminars and their own coaching manuals. This year they’re running 9-12 day ‘Ocean’ courses in the Pacific north-west. The curriculum, which includes training in storm survival techniques, reefing techniques, MOB retrieval practice using a life sling, learning how to make sail repairs and rig inspections, diesel and electrical training, and navigation skills from celestial navigation to sat comms, is a great starting point

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Yachting World

Diving from a boat – advice from the experts

Joshua Shankle and his wife, Rachel offer their thoughts on diving from a boat. Both are experienced divers and sailors. They are currently mid-pacific on a world cruise As cruisers, we can find ourselves in some of the most beautiful places this world has to offer. But more often than not, the real magic lies just below the surface, in the world of the aquatic. Diving from a boat can be a great way to get a better idea of the world that lies below your keel. My wife, Rachel, previously worked as a research diver and Divemaster. Years ago, as we prepared to go cruising, she made it known that one of her few requirements of going sailing long term was to have her own dive compressor on board. As a result, we’ve made diving a priority during our voyage planning, and have been immensely rewarded with some of the most incredible undersea experiences of our lives. Today scuba diving is considered a relatively safe activity due to advancements in gear, safety procedures and, above all, standardised training requirements. But it could be easy to overlook the risks inherent in the sport. Scuba certifications ensure all participants have the same knowledge and understanding of the sport at a given certification level, and this should be the first step in diving safely from your boat. Be careful how you lift dive gear into the dinghy. Photo: voyagesofagape.com Before setting off on your own, it’s advisable to complete your PADI Open Water course, as well as an Advanced course. Log enough dives that you are comfortable underwater without a Divemaster to ensure you have adequate knowledge of the gear, safe diving practices, and navigating underwater. In theory, you are ready to dive independently of a shop and Divemaster after passing your Open Water (level one course). However, to be truly confident I recommend completing an Advanced course and/or have a minimum of 15-20 dives. We all learn at different speeds and it is a unique timeline for everyone to gain confidence in the water. Tanks and air There are many makes and models of compressors on the market, including gas, diesel,

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