Yacht
Charter
Marbella

Blog

Yachting and Boating

Yachting World

Best Black Friday wetsuit deals

We’ve trawled through all the wetsuit offers we can find, to bring you the best Black Friday wetsuit deals available in the 2022 sales For watersports activities, the correct heat retaining, technical clothing is imperative, particularly in the winter when the water temperature can drop to as low as 7°C. If you want to stay out on the water through the colder months and even in summer if you are likely to get wet then a wetsuit is an essential bit of kit. We’ve trawled through all the sales to pick out the best Black Friday wetsuit deals so you don’t have to. Neoprene wetsuits (longjohns) or steamers (generally full length with long sleeves and high fitting collar) that fit like a second skin are among the most popular options for winter wear not least because of their heat retaining properties. Sor summer use, many also go for the longohn option which provides freedom of movement in your arms while also offering maximum protection for your legs. But for really warm weather a shortie wetsuit is preffered by some, which will keep your trunk warm but keeps your arms and legs free from constricting neoprene. Generally speaking for a cold water wetsuit you need between 3.2–5.3mm neoprene thickness and, although most wetsuits/steamers are fairly versatile, it is wise to choose one designed specifically for the sport intended. For summer, you’ll want to look for a wetsuit that is 3mm or thinner, which will offer better flexibility but will retain heat less well. For dinghy sailing, choose one that has reinforcements in the seat and knees, the areas that are exposed to friction. Also you’ll find dinghy sailing wetsuits are generally constructed using slightly thinner neoprene under the arms and high stress areas to aid flexibility and to help avoid pinching. Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence. Best Black Friday wetsuit deals Musto Sunblock Impact Longjohn Musto is a very well established UK brand, who come from the dinghy sailing part of the watersports world. As such many of their wetsuits

Read More »
Yachting World

Black Friday drybag deals: Our pick of the best waterproof bag bargains

Whether you’re after a waterproof backpack or a simple weatherproof pouch, you’ll find what you’re after in our guide to the best Black Friday drybag deals… Salt water – the universal enemy of pretty much every sensitive bit of kit on board your yacht. Keeping your things clean and dry can be a challenge, particularly when the weather kicks up, so a decent drybag is a real must-have. If yours has seen better days, our round-up of the best Black Friday drybag deals is the best place to start shopping for a replacement. We’ve trawled through all the major retailers on both sides of the Atlantic looking for the best deals, and are pleased to report that there is a wide selection of brands getting involved in Black Friday 2022, including big boating names such as Helly Hansen and Gill. Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence. 6 of the best Black Friday drybag deals Zavarea Waterproof Dry Bag Set Was £24.98, now £12.79 at Amazon This great value 5-piece bundle from Zavarea is made from 210T polyester taffeta and includes a range of sizes from 1.5L to 6L. Ideal for canoeing, kayaking or dinghy sailing, these stuffsacks feature rolltop and buckle closure. Be warned though – the retailer doesn’t recommend using them to protect electronics. View Deal Gill 50L Dry Cylinder Bag Was $69.95, now $52.46 at Moosejaw.com (US only) Tested by our man Toby Hodges last year, this Gill drybag features removable shoulder straps, which mean it can be used as a waterproof backpack too – and that’s just as well, as you may be tempted to cram a lot of heavy gear inside. The Gill 50L emerged from the dunk test with the best rating of all the cylinder drybags we tested in 2021. View Deal Overboard Classic Canvas Dry Sack 40L Was $61.10/£62.82, now $49.49/£46.49 at Tradeinn.com As the name suggests, Overboard is a boating specialist that makes the kind of super-waterproof kit that can deal with an MOB situation. We tested their 30L backpack and 40L

Read More »
Yachting World

Black Friday Garmin Watch Deals: Our pick of the best bargains

We pick out some of the best Black Friday deals on products we love. Here’s our pick of the best Black Friday Garmin Watch deals in 2022 Garmin make some of the best smart watches available anywhere on the market. We’ve reviewed several Garmin watches and we rate them very highly so we’ve scoured the current and upcoming holiday deals to save you some time. If you’re looking to invest in yourself and work on your personal fitness and health, then these watches are absolutely worth a look. There’s an array of different watches to suit different lifestyles and sporting activities. There’s something for almost everyone. Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence. Black Friday Garmin Watch Deals UK Garmin fenix 6 Solar, Solar-powered Multisport GPS Watch, Advanced Training Features and Data, Silver with Black Band The Fenix 6 Solar is a brilliant bit of kit for anyone who loves sports and being active. Garmin brought out a new model, the fenix 7, but this just means there’s some excellent bargains to be found on this model.  For the money it’s got to be one of the best smart sports watches on the market. With the solar too, the battery life it brilliant. Was: £649.99 Now: £394.99 View Deal Quatix 6X Solar 30% off the Quatix 6X Solar over at Garmin. We’ve tested several of the Quatix watches and we were blown away with their functionality and versatility. The battery life is excellent and with the solar version, it’s just that little bit better, lasting several days longer than the standard non solar version. The X version gives a larger screen size and suits those with serious intentions for adventure and require a bigger screen and those who can wear a larger watch on their wrist. Was: £999.99 Now: £699.99 View Deal Garmin fenix 6S Pro, Ultimate Multisport GPS Watch, Smaller-Sized, Features Mapping, Music, Grade-Adjusted Pace Monitoring and Pulse Ox Sensors, Black with Black Band The same great Fenix 6 but for smaller wrists.   Despite being superceded by a newer fenix

Read More »
Yachting World

Black Friday cooler deals: Our pick of the best bargains

Whether you’re looking for a cooler backpack or a hard cooler, there are some great Black Friday cooler deals to be had this year…. From lakeside anglers to offshore boaters, there will be thousands of savvy shoppers looking out for the best Black Friday cooler deals this year. If you’re reading this, you’ve just saved yourself a lot of research, as we’ve trawled through the top retailers to bring you the best deals ahead of Black Friday 2022. Looking at hard coolers, Igloo has gone big this year with big discounts across multiple outlets, and there are several deals on cooler backpacks to be had as well. So without further ado, let’s get stuck in… Igloo BMX 72 Quart Cooler Was $269.25, now $149 at Walmart The biggest cooler in our round-up of the best Black Friday cooler deals is also the one with the biggest discount. Igloo claims that the BMX 72 can keep ice frozen in 90F/32C heat for up to five days, and the chunky handles and latches indicate the brand’s solid construction. View Deal Arctic Zone Titan Deep Freeze 60 Can Wheeled Cooler Was $79.99, now $54.25 at Amazon If the mere thought of lugging around a hefty cooler full of drinks makes your back ache, then a wheeled cooler is probably a better investment. This one from Arctic Zone uses foam to keep its innards warm – and once the coolbag is safely loaded, the expandable cart can be detached and used for carrying other cargo from shore to ship. View Deal Igloo BMX 25 Quart Cooler Was $114.99, now $79.99 at Amazon Another big saving on the Igloo range, this time from Amazon. The BMX 25 features the same sturdy design as its bigger cousin, except with a single grab handle for easy one-handed carrying. Unlike the BMX 72, this boat cooler is only rated for four days of ice storage. View Deal Igloo BMX 52 Quart Cooler Was $169.99, now $119.99 at Kohls.com At the risk of sounding like a broken record, Igloo really are pushing the boat out this Black Friday. The middle-of-the-range BMX 52 looks like a great compromise between storage

Read More »
Yachting World

Thomas Ruyant grabs Route du Rhum victory and record

Thomas Ruyant is the first home in the Route du Rhum IMOCA 60 fleet after a hard fought battle between himself and Charlie Dalin in the solo race across the Atlantic Thoms Ruyant and his IMOCA 60 LinkedOut at full chat. Photo: Pierre Bouras Thomas Ruyant sailing LinkedOut was has won the IMOCA 60 class in the 2022 Route du Rhum after a tight battle between himself and Charlie Dalin sailing Apivia. Although Dalin led the race from the start, and was 90 miles ahead during the passage of a ridge of light winds after the Azores, Ruyant broke west and outmanoeuvred Dalin on Friday morning and took the lead which he held to this finish line this morning, Monday 21 November. Dalin was a little over eight miles behind when Ruyant crossed the finish line to take the biggest victory of his career. His elapsed time of 11 days 17 hours 36 minutes 25 seconds beats the course record for the class which was 12 days 04 hours 38 minutes and 55 seconds set in 2012 by Francois Gabart by 11 hours 02 minutes and 30 seconds. “I make no secret of it I am only here to win. That is all that interests me. I have one of the best boats in the fleet. There are newer boats on the start line but our 2019 Verdier design is fully optimised to the best level of development,” said Ruyant in Saint Malo. Winning is a fitting farewell to Ruyant’s boat which he is replacing with a new IMOCA 60 ahead of the 2024 Vendée Globe. Dalin has been the stand-out performer in the IMOCA fleet of late, winning the vast majority of races, but Ruyant has also been impressive and the two have never been far from one another. In fact, the pair’s battling goes all the way back to the last Vendée Globe, tussling over the lead until Ruyant broke his port foil early in the Southern Ocean going on to finish sixth. With both sailors awaiting their new boats it was anticipated that they would be pushing hard to win, with the consequences of any damage being

Read More »
Yachting World

Everything you need to know about commissioning a new yacht

Commissioning a yacht marks the start of the ownership adventure. It is also potentially stressful; a lot must happen before you are able to sail away. We look at how to make the most of the handover process and ensure a smooth start to your time on the water. A new yacht emerging from the yard can be far from ready to go to sea. What happens between the build finishing and handover to the new owner – known as commissioning a new yacht – can make the difference between a great experience and a disappointing start to your time afloat. Knowing what is coming can help you be ready for this exciting time. Commissioning a new yacht is a process For the first-time yacht buyer, commissioning often takes longer than expected. Different yards have different approaches to commissioning, some handing part of the process over to a third party or local dealer. Others see it as something that extends from the build to the end of the yacht’s warranty year. Adrian Jones, director of Rustler Yachts, aims to get to know new owners throughout the build process, long before the handover begins. “First and foremost, commissioning should be fun for the owner. Typically, the yacht will have been in build with us for the best part of a year and during that time the owner will hopefully have been able to visit on several occasions; there should be no surprises about the build. “We will have used the boat for a week ourselves to make sure everything works prior to handover. We always commission here in Falmouth and try to hand yachts over in a local marina, then suggest owners sail locally for a week or so, which is no real hardship! A new yacht launch is an exciting time for owners. Photo: Didier Hillaire/GLY “Customers have full access to the engineer specific to their boat for as long as they need. Typically, the actual handover days are split between an engineer showing the systems on the boat and taking the boat sailing. This is usually with myself, my colleague Nick, the sailmaker and sometimes the rigger.” Spirit Yachts’

Read More »
Yachting World

Golden Globe skipper Tapio Lehtinen rescued by fellow competitor after 24 hours in liferaft

Kirsten Neuschäfer has rescued fellow Golden Globe Race skipper Tapio Lehtinen after Lehtinen’s boat sank and he spent over 24 hours adrift in the southern Indian Ocean. Although much modified, Asteria is the only boat in the Golden Globe Race that was originally designed for racing. Photo: Golden Globe Race Golden Globe skipper Tapio Lehtinen has been rescued by fellow solo competitor Kirsten Neuschäfer after Lehtinen’s boat sank and he spent over 24 hours adrift in the southern Indian Ocean. Lehtinen and Neuschäfer were both racing in the ‘retro’ single-handed non-stop around the world Golden Globe Race, in 2nd and 3rd place respectively. At 0800 this morning, race HQ confirmed that Neuschäfer had successfully rescued Lehtinen from his life raft, and “after a glass of rum, transferred him aboard the Bulk Carrier DARYA GAYATRI.” Lehtinen was 2nd in the 2022 Golden Globe Race when his yacht Asteria sank. Photo: GGR/Etienne Messikommer Golden Globe rescue Yesterday, at 0654 (UTC), Lehtinen manually activated his Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) while some 450 miles south east of Port Elizabeth in South Africa. At 0922 UTC Lehtinen activated the emergency YB3 satellite tracking and texting device which is part of the grab bag, and at 1002 UTC manually acknowledged the message sent by the GGR Crisis Team. In communication with organisers via the YB3, he reported that his Gaia 36 Asteria had rapidly sank, stern first, and that he was in the liferaft, and was wearing a survival suit. At 1105 he messaged: “I GAVE ASTERIA A LAST SALUTE STANDING IN THE RAFT AS SHE WENT DOWN” Weather conditions at the time were 15-20 knot winds with 3-4m waves. Initial reports from the Golden Globe race organisers made clear the enormity of the rescue, and also explaining that without his usual glasses, the 64-year-old Finnish sailor was struggling to read and send messages. Race organisers also raised the alarm with fellow competitors. Initially 4th-placed sailor Abhilash Tomy, who was himself rescued mid-ocean during the 2018 race, turned back towards Lehtinen’s position. Tomy was approx 170 miles south-west of Asteria’s last known position. Third-placed Kirsten Neuschafer was closer, around 105 miles south-west of Lehtinen’s last known position,

Read More »
Yachting World

Can the America’s Cup make great TV?

The long-rumoured America’s Cup TV series has some great talent behind it – but will the arcane world of the ‘Auld Mug’ ever have blockbuster appeal, asks Toby Heppell ? A long-rumoured America’s Cup TV series now looks set to be going ahead with a top-level studio and producers onboard. But will a docu-series drive eyes onto an event that can struggle to increase audience beyond the world of die-hard sailing fans? When the 37th America’s Cup protocol was first revealed in November 2021, outlining the plans for the next America’s Cup in 2024, it contained a stated intention to produce a documentary series to accompany the event. However, the confirmation was far from a guarantee, loosely stating: ‘With a view to opening the doors and the continued drive to increase the global audience of the America’s Cup and the sport of sailing, a condition of entry to competitors is [that] they agree to be part of a potential behind-the-scenes documentary series. The intention of this is to bring the secrecy, the drama and all the teams’ personalities into the limelight.’ With little mention of progress on this idea since, you may have been forgiven for thinking it had been quietly dropped, but last week the organisers of the next AC officially confirmed it would be going ahead. A release from the America’s Cup stated that: “America’s Cup and Skydance Sports have announced an exclusive partnership to produce an all-access, behind-the-scenes documentary series. “Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin, the Academy Award-winning directors of the 2018 documentary Free Solo, will executive produce under their Little Monster Films banner alongside their Academy Award-winning Free Solo producer Evan Hayes and his Anomaly Content & Entertainment (ACE) production company, with David Ellison, Jesse Sisgold and Jon Weinbach of Skydance.” This is big news for the world of sailing with serious talent backing a series based around the sport’s most recognisable brand. David Ellison and Skydance have been responsible for some of the most successful blockbusters of recent years, including the box office record-breaking Top Gun: Maverick and Mission Impossible and Jack Reacher action movies. Academy Award-Winning Directors Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin. Photo: America’s

Read More »
Yachting World

Starlink for yachts: true remote connection for your boat

Phil Johnson looks at Starlink for cruising sailors and asks if internet everywhere and remote switching is set to revolutionise the boating world Imagine you’re peacefully anchored in a tight cove on the lee of some remote uninhabited island with zero mobile phone reception. But you unexpectedly need to speak with family or a colleague about something important – so you chat by FaceTime. Then you spend the evening streaming a film on Netflix. You don’t even stop to check your connection. This scenario is getting closer to reality for some cruisers with the release of Starlink RV and Maritime versions. Starlink promises truly unlimited broadband satellite internet service without breaking the bank – but is it really the perfect solution on board? Starlink is the first in a new generation of low-earth orbiting satellite communications services that promise to deliver low-latency, broadband internet everywhere. Developed by Elon Musk’s SpaceX, Starlink has launched over 2,500 satellites to date – spread out in a diagonal web flying across our horizon. To connect with the network, users purchase a satellite dish (the so called ‘Dishy McFlatface’) and wifi router, assisted by an app downloaded on their phone. In other words, just plug in the satellite dish and “Boom! you’ve got lightning fast internet everywhere you want to sail!” Or at least that’s the sales pitch that my wife and co-skipper, Roxy, gave me after ordering a Starlink RV unit to install on our 1986 Cheoy Lee Pedrick 47, Sonder, which we’ve called home for nearly four years while living and working remotely. Taking delivery of Starlink. Around two months ago a large cardboard box from Starlink arrived. With excitement, we tore into it and put Dishy with its heavy four-legged stand straight on top of the deck, connecting the 75ft cable to the router – which also serves as the power supply – and opened the app to configure. The whole process took all of five minutes and soon the dish’s motor stirred to life, tilting the antennae from one side of the horizon to the other. From our relatively remote anchorage on the Dalmatian coast of Croatia, we were instantly getting

Read More »
Yachting World

Caudrelier wins the 2022 Route du Rhum with new course record

The close-fought three-way battle for victory in the 2022 Route du Rhum has concluded with a new course record and win for Charles Caudrelier Charles Caudrelier sailing his Ultime trimaran Maxi Edmond de Rothschild was first to cross the finish line of the 2022 Route du Rhum race in Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloup with a finishing time of 6 days 19 hours 47 minutes and 25 seconds. This finishing time is a new (yet to be ratified) course record for the Route du Rhum with Caudrelier beating the previous best set in the last race by Francis Joyon of 7 days 14 hours 21 minutes and 47 seconds, despite conditions being far from favourable. After the line an emotional Caudrelier said, “I’m not even tired. The first 24 hours were hard. I so wanted to win the race for the team. I’ve been dreaming of it since I was young. It’s for the family Rothschild. It seemed like a crazy idea, building a boat that could fly. It’s for Franck Cammas, as he had the experience. Without him I wouldn’t be here. He left me the place for the Rhum. He could have won it himself. It’s a Formula 1 team and I just drive in the race. This is a team effort and there’s Guillaume Verdier, the designer. I recently lost my mother and she isn’t here to share this moment. Thanks to everyone for believing in me.” Maxi Edmond de Rothschild shortly before winning the 2022 Route du Rhum. Photo: Alexis Courcoux / Route du Rhum It has been an impressively close battle between the top three Ultime trimarans throughout much of the 3,542 mile race. Caudrelier led the fleet from the start but has not had things all his own way. Initially the race committee claimed he was one of several boats over the starline and as such would need to stop for four hours. However, Caudrelier’s race team provided a significant amount of GPS data to the race officials to show that he was actually some distance behind the startline at the gun and the penalty was dropped. Although he led out of the start and at the

Read More »
Yachting World

“A torrent of flames came out of my cabin” – dramatic mid-ocean rescues in the Route du Rhum

One skipper abandons ship after his IMOCA explodes into flames, another is rescued by a fellow competitor after capsizing, and a third has their trimaran shipwrecked on the Spanish shore – the latest incidents in the Route du Rhum 2022 Fabrice Amedeo in the water awaiting rescue It has been another intense 24 hours in the Route du Rhum 2022, with two dramatic mid-ocean rescues, as well as multiple other abandonments as the 138-boat fleet continues to contend with punishing transatlantic conditions. Most dramatic was Fabrice Amedeo’s mid-ocean rescue. Amedeo was forced to abandon his IMOCA 60 Nexans – Art et Fenêtres after it literally exploded into fire mid-ocean. He was rescued by a nearby freighter M/V Maersk Brida. Amedeo, a former journalist turned ocean racer, gave an extraordinary description of the events leading up to his rescue: “Sunday morning: everything is fine on board and I’m having a great race. The boat is flying hard in the squalls and the sea is heavy. Suddenly, I realise that my ballast has exploded on a wave and that I have several hundred litres of water in the boat. I stop to be safe and start to empty everything. “At that moment, the batteries are immediately affected by the water and failed and I had a complete blackout on board. I have no more electricity: no more autopilot, no more computer, no more electronics. I decide, in consultation with my team, to proceed cautiously towards Cascais. “Sunday afternoon: big smoke on board the boat. I use the extinguisher, I put on my TPS (survival suit). I alert the race direction who asks a competitor in IMOCA to divert to assist me if necessary. The smoke eventually stops. I decide to resume my passage to Cascais. An image sent by Fabrice Amedeo shortly after radioing for help. Photo: Fabrice Amedeo / Nexans – Art et Fenêtres “I meet James Harayda, the skipper of Gentoo who had come to the area to help me. I thank him and resume my passage. I completely dry the boat and prepare myself for a difficult passage… “Again 2h30 of siesta then 7 hours on the helm. Shortly

Read More »
Yachting World

How to put together a yacht’s medical kit

Pip Hare runs through the most important kit you should consider having in yacht’s medical kit, particularly if you are heading offshore for an extended period Putting together a ship’s medical kit is a lot like preparing a boat for a long voyage. It is about envisaging all the scenarios that could affect the health of you and your crew, and making sure you are ready with the skills and equipment to address them. Before each passage you’ll need to assess how far from help you’ll be at any given time and what level of medical care would be required on board to keep a casualty safe and stable until professional help can be accessed. This is something people often put to the back of their minds – I’m guilty of the same – always addressing how we can repair our boats, but not taking the same level of precaution with the humans sailing them. A pragmatic approach is essential: we need to plan for the very worst but on the understanding that it is unlikely to happen – in the same way we carry a liferaft and assemble grab bags. We also need to accept the limitations of our abilities to deliver all medical care on board, but keep that risk in perspective. A good medical kit, support and training are the best way to manage the risk of getting ill or injured at sea. Get trained and checked Before setting off on an ocean voyage, I would recommend at least one member of the crew undertakes advanced medical training, appropriate for those who are not able to access professional medical help for days. If sailing double-handed then both co-skippers should take the training and if solo, special techniques to self-treatment will be needed. The ability to treat and manage injuries and illness is in part down to your ability to diagnose problems early and prevent deterioration. When faced with needles, scalpels and the fragility of the human body even some of your strongest crew members may struggle, so get used to handling the kit and practising techniques early. Advanced training can be acquired through specialist offshore medical companies.

Read More »
Yachting World

Dismastings, a capsize and damage toll rises in Route du Rhum

The Route du Rhum 2022 continues to be a tough race for the record fleet with a number of problems overnight as a violent storm front hit all fleets Burton’s Bereau Vallée was previously L’Occitane en Provence, a radical scow-bowed design that impressed in the last Vendée Globe The Route du Rhum’s reputation as one of the toughest offshore races in the solo sailing calendar is proving to be true once again. Last night the IMOCA 60s went through the second Atlantic front of the race and, as Pip Hare on Medallia put it on a video sent from onboard, “This one means business, it’s got teeth!”. The system brought gusts nudging 40 knots and resulted in three dismastings within a three hour period, and the capsize of an Ocean 50. All skippers are safe and uninjured. First Louis Burton on the IMOCA Bureau Vallée dismasted yesterday early evening. Burton was lying 9th at the time. He is safe and motoring back to shore. At around 2000hrs last night, the leading Ocean Fifty trimaran, Solidaires en Peloton – ARSEP skippered by Thibaut Vauchel-Camus, capsized. The skipper is safe inside the central hull and awaiting rescue around 400 miles west of the Portuguese coast. Two Classe 40s also dismasted. One of the leading pack, champion free-skier Aurélien Ducroz on Crosscall lost his rig, as did Amélie Grassi on La Boulangère Bio who was in 10th place while about 350 miles northwest of Cape Finisterre. All skippers are safe. They join Damien Seguin, whose IMOCA was dismasted two days ago after being struck by a cargo ship, and was returning to Lorient under motor and using a kite-power system. Developed by Yves Parlier, the Liberty kite does not require a mast to support it. Seguin is expected to make landfall later today. Pip Hare’s Medallia disappeared from the tracker leading to concerns for fans, but it is just a technical glitch Race followers and fans of Pip Hare were concerned when Medallia’s tracker did not show her position this morning, although her team have confirmed that it is only a tracker issue and all is well onboard, and she continues racing. Conditions

Read More »
Yachting World

Huge Route du Rhum fleet starts: but Briton Sam Goodchild injured, and 2 IMOCAs crash

Huge 138-boat fleet sets off on 2022 Route du Rhum start, but one skipper injured and two IMOCAs collide With 138 single-handed boats on the line, the 2022 Route du Rhum start was always going to be spectacular.  Three days later than originally scheduled, thanks to a severe depression and sea state forecast for the North Atlantic, the 2022 Route du Rhum started today in a near-perfect south-westerly of 11-15 knots with sunshine. All 138 entries – from the giant 100ft Ultimes to the smallest 40-footers – set off upwind from the same line, the largest multihulls furthest out to sea, the huge 38-boat fleet of IMOCAs looking for clean air in the middle, while the 55 Classe 40s ducked and dived around each other and the inner marker as if they were about to start a local club race, not a transatlantic against a multi-million Euro fleet. Photos: Close racing for the Ultimes from the start of the 2022 Route du Rhum. Photos: Philpre Arnaud/Route du Rhum Despite the fact that the race is 3,542 nautical miles to Guadeloupe, there were several boats called OCS at the startline, including the overall leader, Charles Caudrelier on the Gitana Ultime (Maxi Edmond de Rothschild). The standard time penalty is four hours. There was an incident early in the Ocean 50 class, when British skipper Sam Goodchild, the 32-year-old skipper of Leyton, was injured in the pre-start and had to be evacuated ashore to hospital in Saint Malo. He was reported to have injuries to his arms and face. A statement from the team this evening said: “Whilst trimming the sails of his Ocean Fifty Leyton during the start phase Sam Goodchild suffered injuries to his arms and face. A technical problem caused the pedestal winch to backwind and he was hit hard by the handles. He was evacuated from the boat and taken to hospital by doctors. He was able to see his family. It is with deep sadness that he is forced to abandon the Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe.” Ocean 50 skipper Sam Goodchid has had to retire from the Route du Rhum following an injury. Photo: Philpre Arnaud/Route du Rhum

Read More »
Yachting World

World’s coolest yachts: Dilemma

We ask top sailors and marine industry gurus to choose the coolest and most innovative yachts of our times. Juan Kouyoumdjian nominates Dilemma Legendary American yacht designer Nathaneal G Herreshoff is famed for his spectacular America’s Cup designs, drawing every Cup winner for nearly 40 years from 1893-1934. However, among ‘Capt Nat’s’ prolific output of nearly 2000 designs were many smaller yachts which featured innovations that went on to have a lasting impact on yacht design. Among them was his own 38ft wooden gaff sloop racing yacht Dilemma launched in 1891. Dilemma was the first to successfully carry a radical fin keel, made of a steel fin with a lead bulb. Juan K comments: “It was the first time Nat truly departed from the trend of the time: hull lines to minimise wetted surface even when the boat was heeled, a spade rudder and – for the first time – a keel with lead bulb. Dilemma was very much a reference and ahead of its time.” Nat’s own verdict was ‘very satisfactory and fast, except in light airs, when speed was not remarkable.’ Nevertheless, Dilemma won every race she entered. Make sure you check out our full list of Coolest Yachts. Dilemma stats rating: Top speed: 8 knots LOA: 11.6m/38ft Launched: 1891 Berths: 0 Price: unknown Adrenalin factor: 70% Juan Kouyoumdjian Naval architect Juan Kouyoumdjian, widely known as ‘Juan K’, has created successful and distinctive racing yachts including Rambler 88, and three Volvo Ocean Race winners: ABN Amro One, Ericsson 4 and Groupama 4 (now racing as Wizard). He is also the designer behind the ClubSwan line, including the giant Skorpios and new ClubSwan 80. The post World’s coolest yachts: Dilemma appeared first on Yachting World.

Read More »