Blog

Yachting and Boating

Yachting World

Eastbound Atlantic crossing: All the weather info you need

Weather guru, Chris Tibbs talks about the skills and information you need to have a successful eastbound Atlantic crossing Atlantic crossings are usually spoken of in terms of days of running west before the tradewinds (although as sailors we are rarely satisfied and yearn for an angle to turn the dead run into a reach!). An eastbound Atlantic crossing towards Europe poses a different set of issues, but also some good sailing, as we head north into disturbed westerlies. Leaving the Caribbean we head north through the horse latitudes (30°N) where the Azores high ridges towards Florida and the wind becomes light and variable. Once through this ridge we should be able to follow a route north of the high in mainly westerly winds, but far enough south to avoid gales from depressions passing to the north. It is not possible to give an exact latitude where we find the westerlies as it changes. Lows develop and move north-east, displacing the Azores high and allowing the stronger wind to migrate southwards. Avoiding eastbound mid-Atlantic landfalls and taking the shortest route to the UK risks encounters with North Atlantic lows This pushing of the high south will give a succession of lows split by transient ridges of higher pressure, then an acceleration in the wind as the next low passes. The driving force for this is the jetstream steering the lows, and also depends on how well established the Azores high is. If the jet stream is north then a good passage will be had, but if it dips to the south the lows will be more aggressive tracking close to the route and giving stronger winds. This balance between the lows and the high pressure depends on the time of year as the jet stream will usually migrate north in the summer and south in the winter. It is an extension of the weather we get in the UK; as the summer progresses we lose the more aggressive lows and the Azores high becomes better established. Article continues below… Jet stream: Everything you need to know about its effect on sailing What is the jet stream? The jet stream is

Read More »
Yachting World

Extraordinary boats: Andrillot, the original ‘Vertue’ design

Andrillot is the original ‘Vertue’, the design which launched Laurent Giles’s long and illustrious career in 1935. Nic Compton reports German boatbuilder Uli Killer was looking for a boat to sail while he was working on a big restoration project when he spotted Andrillot, a 25ft wooden cutter for sale in Dartmouth, UK. The boat had recently undergone a three-year restoration and was said to be in very good condition for her age. The ad claimed the yacht was ‘an important part of our maritime heritage’ and that she and her sisterships had ‘become legends in their own right’. But to Uli, a relative newcomer to the classic world, she was just a pretty boat at the right price. Andrillot as she was built with a gaff rig. “She looked pretty and was affordable for us. I knew nothing about her history, and I had to ring a friend to ask him who Laurent Giles was!” Killer recalls. “Then I saw articles in English and American magazines and realised she really was such a famous boat, and hundreds of them were built. Being No 1 makes her more interesting.” The boat Uli had inadvertently stumbled across was Andrillot, best known as the ‘original Vertue’, the first of a class which, 85 years after she was launched, is still going strong and now numbers around 200 boats. More by chance than intent, Uli had discovered a unique piece of maritime history, which he was able to buy for less than the price of a new VW Golf. He could hardly believe his luck. It was in 1935 that Guernsey solicitor Dick Kinnersly commissioned British yacht designer Laurent Giles, then at the start of an illustrious career, to design a cruising boat for him. “I was ignorant of yacht design but I knew what I wanted; a boat that would spin on a sixpence and I could sail single-handed,” he told British journalist (and fellow Vertue owner) Adrian Morgan 60 years later. “I don’t mind a transom, I said, and a good entry. I couldn’t afford an engine, so I needed ‘plenty of air’ aloft, which meant a topsail.” The result was

Read More »
Yachting World

World’s coolest yachts: USA 17

We ask top sailors and marine industry gurus to choose the coolest and most innovative yachts of our times. This month Thomas Coville nominates USA 17, the 2010 America’s Cup winner Photo: Reuters/Alamy “I’d have loved to sail on the America’s Cup AC72 cats in San Francisco in 2013, they were so invigorating. Those boats were when Larry Ellison just let free in the America’s Cup and pushed the limits. But perhaps even cooler was the big trimaran challenger, USA 17 [in 2010]. When you saw the size of the wing and the size of Jimmy Spithill steering the boat, and flying on one hull, I think it was totally amazing. “We should give a medal to the generation who was on the America’s Cup in San Francisco for creating so many new ideas and new dynamics, but for me the first step of sailing by flying was when those guys arrived with a trimaran with wings. Today we are trying to recreate that kind of a step by foiling around the world. Jimmy Spithill is dwarfed by USA 17 as he helms the trimaran to victory in the 2010 America’s Cup. Photo: Jose Jordan/AFP/Getty “Jimmy Spithill is my favourite skipper ever – for me he is the skipper that defines an epoch. He’s going to try to fly around the planet on a Jules Verne Trophy one day, for sure.” USA 17 stats rating: Top speed: 40 knotsLOA: 34m/113ftLaunched: 2008Berths: 0Price: €10,000,000Adrenalin factor: 95% Thomas Coville Thomas Coville is one of the world’s most successful ocean racing skippers. In 2016 he set a single-handed around the world record of 49 days, and has won the Volvo Ocean Race, Oryx Quest, Route du Rhum and Transat Jacques Vabre. This winter he skippers a Jules Verne attempt with the foiling trimaran Sodebo Ultim 3. If you enjoyed this…. Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for bluewater cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we have inspirational adventures and practical features to help you realise your sailing dreams. Build your knowledge with a subscription delivered to your door. See our latest offers and save at least 30% off the cover price. The

Read More »
Yachting World

How to follow the Ocean Race Europe

After a change of ownership and something of a hiatus, the Ocean Race is due to start in 2022. But before that the first edition of the Ocean Race Europe will begin in May 2021 Alicante stopover. Start. Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race. 22 October, 2017. On Saturday 29 May, the Ocean Race Europe will set off for the first time ever and will see 12 teams in two classes racing on a multi-stage course from the North Atlantic coast of Europe into the Mediterranean Sea. The Ocean Race is the pinnacle of crewed round the world races. Photo: Ainhoa Sanchez/VOR What is Ocean Race Europe? The Ocean Race Europe is a new event created by the organisers of The Ocean Race – the round the world event originally known as the Whitbread Round the World Race, then the Volvo Ocean Race. The crewed around the world race with stopovers has always been one of yachting’s premier ocean races and is set to take place in 2022/23. But before the next edition of the round the world race, organisers are also running a new event designed to showcase top-flight, fully-crewed, competitive offshore racing based around northern Europe: the Ocean Race Europe. Now under new management, The Ocean Race is scheduled to always run every four years, with the Ocean Race Europe also planned to take place every four years, essentially allowing competition between the teams to take place every two years in one form or another. What is the route for Ocean Race Europe? Leg 1: Lorient, France – Cascais, Portugal Leg 2: Cascais, Portugal – Alicante Spain Leg 3: Alicante Spain – Genova, Italy Two coastal races in Cascais and Genoa offer bonus points to the top three finishers. All the offshore legs will be scored equally using the high points scoring system where the winners in each class receive points equal to the number of entries, second place receive points equal to the number of entries minus one, and so on down the rankings. Article continues below… Dongfeng Race Team wins closest ever Volvo Ocean Race BREAKING NEWS: After nine months of racing, the Volvo Ocean Race

Read More »
Yachting World

Across the Atlantic in a £1500 ferrocement schooner

Tom Cunliffe introduces an extract from The Boat They Laughed At in which Max Liberson sets off across the Atlantic in his Schooner to prove she can make it Of all the yachting books I have read, not one starts like The Boat They Laughed At, by the inimitable Max Liberson: ‘I tapped the large man on the shoulder, interrupting his current occupation which was hitting the security guard repeatedly on the head while he lay in the road. He turned and looked at me. At first he was somewhat at a loss for words. ‘I asked him, “Just what exactly do you think you are doing?” With this he lost his temper and shouted to his mate who was standing behind the security van they were robbing. “Shoot him!” To my horror, the other man had an automatic pistol in his left hand…’ This unusual opening paragraph sets the scene for a rollercoaster read. Max is down on his luck as a dispatch rider in London, but a set of curious chances leads him to a beamy, shallow-draughted ferrocement 42ft schooner, which he buys for the princely sum of £1,500. His pals in the Essex mud laugh at the boat and, in response to a wind-up, Max decides to sail her to the Caribbean and back, which he promptly does against all the odds. Max shows himself to be not only a warm-hearted human being, but also a seaman of considerable ingenuity and grit. His self-steering arrangements are an essay in the understanding of how a boat sails, while his ability to deal with dodgy wiring and his quick fix when his inner forestay falls down are exemplary. We join Max homeward bound mid-Atlantic, with his engine having long since given up the ghost, hacking north across the trades from the Caribbean looking for westerlies. Read on, and ask yourself, as I did, if you really need to spend so much money on your adventures… “Sometimes I would hoist the fisherman staysail. This delightful sail was a big square shape that went between the mast tops. It was very good in light winds, but I would always take it

Read More »
Yachting World

Furlers: All the latest kit on the market

Toby Hodges takes a look at the significant developments that have been a feature of the furler market in the last few years, and picks out some of the best options on the market Easy reefing on the Kraken 66 White Dragon during our heavy airs test, with an in-boom system by Southern Spars. Photo: Kraken Yachts A tug on the working sheet and the furling line, the offwind sail spins open and your boat surges forward, the great joy of a furlers doing that for which they are designed. You’re content in the knowledge that it’s simply a case of releasing the sheet and pulling on the furling line again to have all that sail area tamed and back under wraps in seconds – no wrestling with poles, no dancing around a foredeck grappling with socks or buckets necessary. Continuous line furlers, together with the torsional ropes or cables around which the sails furl, have given us a lot to be grateful for. The ability to manage large code or asymmetric sails with minimal crew is becoming ever easier thanks to advances in structured luff sails and the technology and reliability of furlers. However, choosing the right furler for your bowsprit or stemhead can be quite complex. Are you running only one type of sail off each of your furlers and is that a Code 0 for reaching or a free flying A-sail for sailing deeper angles – or both? The answer will likely determine whether it’ll be more practical to furl the sail from the bottom-up or, as has become more popular, from the top-down. Here, we take a look at Karver’s latest KF V3 model as well as the current range of options in this sector. Article continues below… Is in-boom furling the next big thing in sail handling technology? Even though this remains an expensive option, in-boom furling is one that a growing number of boat owners are adopting.… Facnor FD190 flat deck furler Although not a new product, this webbing line furler is rarely seen outside of French performance cruising yachts, writes Rupert Holmes.… £2,102.00 Our rating:   Most manufacturers of furlers now offer top-down units,

Read More »
Yachting World

Apex 850: First look at giant new superyacht

The planned Apex 850 will instantly take her place as one of the world’s five largest sailing yachts, measuring in at 85m over decks and with a towering 107m mast. Sam Fortescue reports The tie-up between Malcolm McKeon and Royal Huisman continues to bear fruit, this time in the form of the world’s largest sloop, Apex 850. Measuring 85m on deck, this yacht’s mast towers 107m above the water – eclipsing the former Mirabella V, currently the world’s biggest sloop. When she is launched, the Apex 850 will take her place as one of the world’s five largest sailing boats. “The sailing experience of Apex 850 will be sensational, with speeds in excess of wind speed in most conditions,” says designer McKeon. “Her retractable keel, optimised weight distribution and limited heel angle will provide stability, comfort and safety for all on board.” The Apex 850 features a reverse sheer bow Apex 850 is a radical design, according to McKeon. Just look at the all-glass coachroof, which seems to float above the surface of the deck. Under its canopy is 200m2 of dining and lounging space that can be open to the elements or totally enclosed. Windows slide open and even the sliding glass doors can be lowered into hidden cassettes to create a huge party space. Opening wings on the quarters expand the lounging space and complement the huge 50m2 fold-down beach club in the transom, which includes a custom gym. It has direct access from the owner’s suite, via a private beach club and cinema with floor-to-ceiling glass curved to match the lines of the hull. At the level of the mast, shell doors open out of the hull on both sides to provide balconies linked to the deck above with an elegant staircase. They serve as landing stage and lobby, or even as a spot for a quiet evening meal. Accommodation includes four double or twin cabins plus a truly jaw-dropping master that stretches across the full 15m beam of the yacht. Elsewhere, the boat includes a 1,000-bottle wine cave, cigar humidor and a well-equipped dive centre amidships. On deck, there’s a recessed forward cockpit and the garage

Read More »
Yachting World

Gender equality: How SailGP and others are driving female inclusion

SailGP and a new Multi 50 campaign are both pushing gender equality to the fore as these racing programmes try to create space for women at the top of our sport Photo: David Gray for SailGP As part of a remix for this second full season of the foiling world-spanning race series, SailGP, each of the eight teams are to add one female athlete per team. Teams will be incentivised to include female athletes in rotation for ‘active roles’ and to include women in the sixth position, progressing to ‘practice and/or training in key roles’. The Danish team announced early there will be two women in its squad, including Anne-Marie Rindom, a two-time World Champion and Olympic medalist. Photo: Craig Greenhill for SailGP The SailGP circuit, launched by Russell Coutts with backing from Larry Ellison, is an annual international series with similarities to the America’s Cup World Series, but sailed in foiling F50 catamarans. It features many big names from the America’s Cup, a competition which has not seen a women sailor on any team since America3’s Mighty Mary 26 years ago in 1995. The SailGP Gender Equity Initiative is intended to ‘fast-track the development of top female sailors to race on F50s and perform at the highest level’. To help achieve this, SailGP has set up a women’s committee which includes three-time Olympian and Ocean Race winner Carolijn Brouwer, Maria del Mar de Ros, CEO of Spain’s SailGP team and Emily Nagel, former Ocean Race crew member and data analyst specialist. “This is a big step forward for women in professional sailing,” Brouwer comments. “SailGP is creating the opportunity for high-performance female sailors to compete alongside their male peers, in the world’s most advanced sailing league. “This type of initiative will allow us to achieve true gender equity in the future.” The teams are headed by some of the top names in racing. Peter Burling and Blair Tuke lead a team from New Zealand. Jimmy Spithill has newly taken the role of helm for a refreshed US team, Nathan Outteridge the Japanese challenge, Tom Slingsby the Australian team (and reigning champion) and Ben Ainslie leads the British team. There

Read More »