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First look: wallywind110

Almost a year later we are finally getting a taste of the new Wally range with the wallywind110 the first design to be shown under the brand’s new ownership While we were given a tantalising peak last autumn of what iconic Italian brand Wally may be up to under its new Ferretti ownership, only now have full details been disclosed of its sizzling new wallywind range of cruiser-racers, with this wallywind110  the first of a new series, which also includes a 130 and 150. And it’s encouraging to see that it reprises the hallmark features of the most successful Wally Yachts which exude minimalist elegance. These include high bulwarks to help blend in raised saloon lines, an aft deck terrace on the sea, magic trim hydraulic sheeting systems for ease of handling, and an underwater anchoring system. At its heart lies Wally’s promise for blistering performance thanks to a full carbon build and a design that pairs short-handed fast cruising comfort with race winning potential. wallywind is the stylistic brainchild of Wally founder Luca Bassani, combined with naval architecture by Judel/Vrolijk. It’s a partnership which also created the wallycento Hamilton and the 2018 Wally 93 Nahiti, now competing under her new name Bullitt. “The 110 is a true hybrid because it offers the volumes and comforts of a deckhouse yacht, but with a flush deck that offers the spirit and the performance of a racing boat,” Bassani explains. “The raised bulwarks do the job of disguising the fact that this is a raised saloon yacht, with the engine room beneath the floor. That means all the advantages of the layout, without the compromised aesthetics.” A quick glance at the visuals will show you the opulent amount of social space the design team has created on deck. With no coamings, the full extent of the 80m2 cockpit is employed, allowing seating for up to 15 guests within the security of the bulwarks. Most of the deck furniture is removable for racing, while below the aft terrace is space for a garage for a 4m tender. The interior is bathed in natural light, chiefly thanks to a skylight running the full length

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Yachting World

Weather forecasting in a heatwave

Weather guru, Chris Tibbs talks though some of the difficulties in accurate weather forecasting during the unusual event of a heatwave Situated to the north-west of Europe, the UK is blessed with mild weather with few extreme weather events, and our temperature is moderated by the seawater around the shores. Thanks to the Gulf Stream bringing a never-ending supply of warm water we have ice-free winters, while the sea also moderates the maximum temperatures during the summer. Compared to the extremes of temperature experienced by countries at the same latitude in the middle of continents we are fortunate indeed. Even though the UK is relatively small, there are significant differences across it with the west being more of a maritime climate and the east continental. Earlier this summer we saw temperature records not just broken but smashed with UK temperatures going above 40°C for the first time in recorded history. Increasing temperatures have been forecast by climate scientists. We know that although heat waves are rare, they will get more frequent, be hotter, and last for longer. So how will this affect our sailing? The well established high pressure system during the 2022 UK heat wave prevented the development of sea breezes Sea breezes With increasing temperatures over the land, will this give good sailing sea breezes that drop away at night to leave anchorages calm and peaceful? Unfortunately, the development of sea breezes is a fairly complex process and the heating of the land to above that of the sea water temperature is just one component of the puzzle. As the land heats we need some moist convection to start the sea breeze process off. This is most clearly seen by the development of cumulus clouds over the land. The rising air and moisture generate the clouds and with their ascent, the surface pressure lowers. Air flows through the clouds and moves over the sea where it descends, slightly increasing the pressure over the sea. Air moves from the higher pressure over the sea to the lower pressure over the land and we get a sea breeze developing. But – and it is a very big but – the

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Yachting World

How to future proof your sailing – Jimmy Cornell’s top tips

The world’s weather is changing. Cruising guru Jimmy Cornell explains how to future-proof your sailing and voyage planning ‘Sailing routes depend primarily on weather, which changes little over the years. However, possibly as a result of the profound changes that have occurred in the ecological balance of the world environment, there have been several freak weather conditions in recent years. The most worrying aspect is that they are rarely predicted, occur in the wrong season and often in places where they have not been known before. Similarly, the violence of some tropical storms exceeds almost anything that has been experienced before. ‘The depletion of the ozone layer and the gradual warming of the oceans will undoubtedly affect weather throughout the world and will increase the risk of tropical storms. The unimaginable force of [recent] mega hurricanes should be a warning of worse things to come. ‘All we can do is heed those warnings, make sure that the seaworthiness of our boats is never in doubt and, whenever possible, limit our cruising to the safe seasons. Also, as the sailing community depends so much on the forces of nature, we should be the first in protecting the environment, and not contribute to its callous destruction.’ Those words were written in 1994 in the foreword to the third edition of my book World Cruising Routes, but they are more pertinent than ever today. In the intervening years the global weather conditions have seen major changes, especially in the location, frequency, strength and extra-seasonal occurrence of tropical cyclones. So how can we as cruisers plan voyages in such a rapidly-changing world? NASA satellite image shows four hurricanes affecting North America simultaneously on 15 September 2020; Katarina off Baja California, Sally above the Gulf of Mexico, Paulette near Bermuda and Teddy off the Leeward Islands, while wildfires rage from California to Colombia Warmer oceans In its sixth assessment of the impact of climate change, published in April 2022, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns that climate change is causing dangerous disruption in nature and is affecting billions of people, stressing the urgency to act. The oceans are getting warmer The Arctic ice cap

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Yachting World

Second hand boats: buying big charter yachts

Will Bruton takes a look at the best way to to buy, manage, and charter a bigger yacht an increasingly popular options for many buyers Small enough to sail without a large crew, but big enough to charter, pocket superyachts between 55-100ft have become increasingly popular. A compelling proposition for both owners and charterers; buying one is a step-up in complexity. We explore how to buy, manage, and bigger charter yacht. There’s no denying that yachts have got bigger, and yachts of a scale that were once the preserve of professional crew are now regularly bought to be sailed by couples. However, there has also been a boom in yachts that are too much for two people to handle, but offer impressive mile-covering potential and luxurious comfort without requiring an army on board, and thanks to the proliferation of technology like lifting keels, can still offer the chance to enjoy idyllic spots at anchor. Jens Oomes has spent over 15 years in the yachting industry. Seeing a growing market for yachts between 55-100ft, he set up Invisible Crew (invisiblecrew.com) to cater for the unique demands of the growing pocket superyacht market. “Pocket superyachts are popular for a lot of reasons, but the balance of comfort they offer at a size that’s still manageable to own is certainly a big part of the appeal. Whether monohull or catamaran, ‘pocket superyachts’ are proving popular for charters. Photo: diYachting “It is a size, though, where effective management becomes crucial,” he adds. “These yachts have become known as pocket superyachts because of the level of systems and comfort on board, which demand more maintenance than those under 50ft.” Lizzie Abbiss runs diYachting (diyachting.co.uk), an agency specialising in the charter and management of crewed yachts between 50-100ft. A rapidly growing area of the charter business, she has seen more prospective owners than ever seeking out a yacht that can pay some of its way, and demanding a higher rate for charter. Post-pandemic, it’s a market that’s booming. Article continues below… Second hand boats: buying a classic yacht Over the last three decades there has been a spectacular classic boat revival, resulting in – and further

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Yachting World

East-bound Atlantic crossing via Bermuda

An east-bound Atlantic crossing via Bermuda and Horta was a voyage of contrasts for Vivian Vuong We tacked for the first and only time on our 13-day crossing. The view off Ultima’s bow revealed the alluring sight of not only an approaching landfall but elevation too. Pico, one of the nine Azorean islands of Portugal, jutted out from the Atlantic. The volcano’s crater and base were exposed, while swirls of cloud encircled the entire midsection. “We can hike to the top,” Nathan suggests. My legs yearned for a stomp after two weeks on the boat. I know that while my husband is fuelled by the deep ocean and passage making, it’s the exploration of new places, foods and culture that is my motive to sail. So with these and a love for adventure in mind we designed an itinerary for crossing the Atlantic with Bermuda and the Azores as our waypoints. Before we owned our Compass 47, we’d managed a sail charter business, living in the beautiful Grenadines but working long hours with only rare days off. I would stare at beaches and peaks, daydreaming from my office desk, and seldom got a chance to truly explore the island we lived on. We also delivered sailing and motor yachts for a living while saving up for our own boat. Our routine would be to arrive at an airport, taxi to the marina, provision and prepare the yacht, then shove off. Any desire to explore the exotic locations each boat was in had to be satisfied by a day or two ashore, usually eating at restaurants within walking distance of the marina or going for a short swim, if time allowed. We bought Ultima three years ago, eager to start our sail training company Ocean Passages, hoping to voyage the world at our own pace. But running a travel business during a pandemic was not sensible, so we delayed our international trips and instead sailed as far up and down the US east coast as we could from Florida to Maine. We became true snowbirds, migrating from north to south with the seasons, then were finally able to indulge ourselves by

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Yachting World

AC40: first flight for the ‘mini’ America’s Cup yachts

Emirates Team New Zealand have completed a successful first day of testing for the new AC40, which will be used in the run up to the 37th America’s Cup, and for the Youth and Women’s AC America’s Cup Defender, Emirates Team New Zealand has reported a successful maiden sail of the first AC40 in New Zealand on Tuesday, 20 September 2022, following successful tow testing earlier in the week. The ‘mini’ America’s Cup class is a brand new design. On the boat’s first sail the crew successfully completed a foiling tack and foiling gybe, showing how rapidly the design of this new generation of foiling monohulls has evolved. The purchase of one AC40 is a prerequisite for every team entering the 37th America’s Cup with the scaled-down boats being used for an America’s Cup preliminary series (two events in the run up to the Cup itself), and the reintroduced Youth America’s Cup. Both the Youth AC and Preliminary Events (previously called the America’s Cup World Series) concept have been a feature of past America’s Cups, but both were dropped in the run-up to the 36th America’s Cup in Auckland. The 37th AC will also introduce a new concept in the Women’s America’s Cup, which will (controversially for many) take place in the smaller AC40 class. The AC40 during it’s first day of testing in New Zealand. Photo: Emirates Team New Zealand The first AC40 test sail was undertaken by a number of Emirates Team New Zealand crew, with the boat skippered by the team’s latest high-profile signing, Nathan Outteridge. The Kiwi team reports that it took just a few minutes for helmsman Nathan Outteridge to go from a cautious displacement mode to popping the AC40 up onto its foils and off on starboard tack, sailing at 20+ knots boat speed in the light 8-10 knots of breeze. Despite his considerable America’s Cup experience (Outteridge was the skipper of Artemis Racing in both the 2013 and 2017 America’s Cups) this was the Australian’s first day sailing one of the Cup foiling monohull yachts. “It was obviously a very successful day, it was an impressive boat to sail for my first time

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Yachting World

How to sail a multihull: your questions answered

Nikki Henderson reveals what you really need to know before going bluewater multihull cruising It has become routine now for me to bookend the summer sailing season with a trip to the south of France for the biannual ‘Outremer Week’. This hugely popular event gathers 100-plus new Outremer catamaran owners for five days of training, both in the classroom and on the water, and three days of friendly racing. The goal is to educate future owners so they are as prepared as they possibly can be for their upcoming bluewater cruising plans. It’s an intensive week of 12-hour days, with a lot of information to absorb. Unsurprisingly there are some discussions specific to bluewater cruising in a catamaran that come up repeatedly, and they apply to owners or prospective owners of all brands of bluewater multihull. Here are some of the most common questions people ask me: What sails should I buy for a multihull? Every day after sailing an owner will come up to me and say, “Nikki, I’d love to take up some of your time and rack your brains about sail selection.” To pitch my advice appropriately, I always ask some key questions and I’d encourage you to ask yourself the same. What is your route plan? Tradewind sailing will be predominantly downwind. So, focus your attention on downwind sails. A route involving more upwind requires more focus on headsails. Routes involving more upwind tend to be more coastal routes, or schedules with strict timings that will reduce the option to wait for downwind weather windows. All bluewater plans will need storm options. Three reef points in the main is a must, or at the very least an extremely generous second reef. A storm headsail is another key component. Ideally it should be possible to hoist the storm jib up over the top of your furled foresail. In very big conditions, reliance on the thin furling line gets quite nerve-racking. Multihull sail options range from symmetric spinnakers to Code sails for reaching performance. Photo: Nicolas Claris How performance-orientated are you? Performance catamarans are designed to sail angles downwind, ideally with an asymmetric spinnaker wardrobe. However, there is

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Yachting World

Extraordinary boats: 5.5 Metre Jean Genie

The 5.5 Metre Jean Genie is the first ever British boat to win the prestigious Scandinavian Gold Cup, also winning this year’s 5.5 Metre World Championship Cowes-based businessman Peter Morton, widely known as Morty, is a serial winner who’s enjoyed a long career on the podium at everything from the Admiral’s Cup and Half Ton Cup, to the Quarter Tonners and the Fast 40 fleet. However, while much of the world was curtailed by Covid restrictions, Morton was busy establishing a complex two-boat campaign to take on another highly competitive class. “I’ve always thought the 5.5s are fantastic, elegant boats,” he told me, “but it was only when the Worlds came to Cowes in 2018 that I took a closer look.” He liked what he saw and when a 2003 boat came on the market during the championship Morton agreed a deal to buy it. “I thought it would be a nice little taster,” he says. “We started by looking at some of the systems and figured we could improve on them. So we did some modifications over the winter, then took it to Lake Garda in spring 2019 and won the Alpen Cup, sailing with Ben Cornish and Andrew ‘Dog’ Palfrey.” Next was the 2019 Worlds in which they finished 5th, followed with a 4th place at the Worlds in Sydney in January 2020, but this time only three points behind the 2nd-placed boat overall. It was time to look for a new boat. The 5.5 Metre class originated in 1949, based on the Metre Rule, and allows unrestricted development and a wide range of design interpretations, as long as each boat fits within the 5.5 Metre formula (a calculation of the boat’s length, displacement and sail area). Today the class races in three divisions: Classic, Evolution and Modern, with the latter including all boats from 1994 onwards. Since 2000 almost every new 5.5 Metre has been built by Wilke in Switzerland, to designs by Sebastian Schmidt. Morton was tempted to do the same, but considered that if a 16-year-old boat was still competitive there might be scope for more development in the class. Elliot Hanson, Andrew Palfrey and

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Yachting World

How to use your autopilot for downwind sailing

Round the world racer Josh Hall explains to Andy Rice how to make the most of your autopilot for downwind sailing to make your boat faster and safer Top-spec autopilots have become very sophisticated, not least in the use of AI (artificial intelligence), so much so that modern autopilot systems on an IMOCA 60 won’t leave you much change out of €500,000. Fortunately many classes, such as the Class 40, don’t permit AI, and the autopilot remains an affordable extra crew member that doesn’t require food or sleep. Meanwhile the drive for ever-better reliability and reaction time demanded by the racing community has led to trickle-down improvements for pilots used in cruising applications. Josh Hall has done enough solo miles to understand the good, the bad and the ugly of your typical mid-range autopilot system. Here Josh offers his five best tips on how to set up your boat for fast and safe downwind sailing, where you’re working in harmony with – not against – your precious autopilot. Keep the centre of effort forward The Class 40 boats are pretty much designed to be reaching and running machines in much the same way as the IMOCA boats. In strong downwind conditions we don’t sail these boats like traditional, heavier boats. They’re asymmetric with bowsprit, so you need to keep the true wind angle on a fairly hot setting to maximise the speed. To keep the boat tracking downwind in a fast and safe mode, make sure the centre of effort of the sail plan is well in front of the mast. It’s better to have a well-reefed mainsail and have two headsails up because the boat will be much better behaved in a straight line as well as being easier to gybe. On a cruising boat it’s quite possible to have two headsails out and the mainsail down altogether. You reduce the risk of a broach enormously once you take the mainsail out of the equation. For best performance an autopilot needs to be constantly monitored and adjusted. Photo: Paul Wyeth Aim for high averages Speed is your friend. The average ocean wave travels at 25 knots, so when you’re

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Yachting World

Around Alone: Extract from Emma Richards’ book

Tom Cunliffe introduces this extract from Around Alone as a solo mast climb in the South Atlantic turns into a terrifying ordeal for Emma Richards In 2002, Emma Richards (now Sanderson) was the youngest person and the first British woman to finish the ‘Around Alone’ race. Sailing the Open 60 Pindar, she was pipped at the post for a podium finish, but reading her book 20 years later, I realised again that the placing is less important than the character of the men and women who take up the challenges of the great single-handed events. The skill and sheer guts lie outside the experience of the rest of us, relatively normal sailors. This extract from Emma’s Around Alone is by far the best description I have come across of the horrors of climbing a mast on a solo race boat. Read it and, as I did, ask yourself how you might have measured up. For a vivid glimpse into this race, have a look on YouTube for videos from the 2002 Around Alone. Now, over to Emma… Extract from Around Alone We were a fraction south of the Tropic of Capricorn and slap bang in the middle of the South Atlantic when the main halyard broke. Namibia lay 2,000 miles due east, Brazil 2,000 miles to the west. They might as well have been a million miles away, I felt suddenly so isolated. I’d planned to go up at dawn, but I ended up waiting to allow some black clouds to blow through. The wind was varying between 15 and 25 knots and I needed to make sure I had a sail setting to cover the range of winds while I was up there. I prepared the gear I’d need to take up. I took a knife to cut away the old dead end, the spare main halyard (240ft), some tape and a block in case the one at the top had been the cause of the halyard breaking. I put my video camera in my pocket, strapped on my helmet and psyched myself up. The ascent would be via a length of rope stretched between the top of the

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Yachting World

Best folding kayaks: Your guide to collapsible, foldable, inflatable and detachable paddling craft

The best folding kayaks are absolutely amazing pieces of kit – you get a boat to go exploring in, but you don’t need loads of space to store it, or a roofrack to transport it. Oru Bay ST Owning your own kayak gives you the freedom to paddle wherever you like, whenever you like, but full-size boats are not the easiest thing to store or transport. This is where the best folding kayaks really come into their own. Easy (or at least much easier) to stash when not in use, the best collapsible kayaks enable you to keep your boat in all kinds of handy places (from the garage or shed to a summerhouse or beach hut). And, with many fitting fairly easily into the back of a car or van, you can even take your kayak on holiday with you. Not all boats are born equal, though. The very best folding kayaks shouldn’t just be easy to move around and store, they also need to be simple and reasonably fast to put together and then disassemble post-paddle. And you also need to consider weight and, most importantly, performance on the water. Like their rigid cousins, the best folding kayaks come in all shapes and sizes, the mechanisms vary enormously, and the cost can differ by a considerable amount. Before making a purchase, you need think about where you’re most likely to paddle your collapsible craft, and in what sort of conditions. Here we look at the premier collapsible paddle craft available today from various different kayak brands, assess their strengths and weaknesses, and help you choose the best folding kayak for your needs and enjoyment. Best collapsible frame kayaks The TRAK 2.0 in action TRAK 2.0 A premium-class collapsible kayak with excellent performance capability in a wide range of conditions Specs  • Price: £3,388 (UK) / $3,850 (US) / €3,868.95 (EU) • Weight: 24kg/53lb • Length (assembled): 490cm/16ft • Width (assembled): 57cm/22.5in • Cockpit length: 77.5cm / 30.5in • Cockpit width: 42cm / 16.5in • Packed size: 104 x 48 x 22cm / 41 x 19 x 9in • Maximum carry weight (including paddler): 159kg / 350lb • Set-up

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Yachting World

Sun protection for sailors: a guide to staying safe

Janneke Kuysters explores the sun protection options for sailors who are often highly at risk of over exposure to the sun Sailing on a sunny day is hard to beat: but apart from the mood-enhancing qualities of the sun, we all know of its dangers. After finishing our circumnavigation and returning to the Netherlands, one of the first things that struck me was how odd it seems to see people in north-western Europe deliberately sitting in the sun, and how it’s often considered rude to keep your sunglasses on when talking to someone. It couldn’t be more different in the tropics, or in countries like Australia or New Zealand, where the sun is avoided as much as possible and hats and sunglasses are worn all day when outside. Dr Karijn Koopmans is an MD of dermatology, and also a keen cruising sailor, exploring coastal waters in Europe. She explains the effects of sunlight on our bodies: “Starting with the skin: sunlight makes it thicker and it stimulates the production of pigments, so you get a tan. But the disadvantage is that sunlight breaks down the elastic fibres in your skin and will make it wrinkly. Even worse is that the sunlight can damage the DNA of your skin cells, which may lead to skin cancer in a later stage. “Sunlight is good for your body, because it stimulates the production of Vitamin D which you need to build bone mass and to protect you against internal types of cancer, like bowel cancer. Sunlight also inhibits the activity of certain immune cells, especially those in your skin. This is put to good use in the treatment of psoriasis or eczema, where we see a marked improvement when the skin is exposed to UV light. The disadvantage is that you are more susceptible to cold sores and such. “Finally, UV light can damage the lenses in your eyes and lead to cataracts.” There are three ways to avoid sun damage: behavioural measures, mechanical and chemical. Behavioural measures simply involve staying out of the sun at its most intense periods (1200-1500). On the average sailing day this may not be possible, especially in

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Yachting World

X-Yachts launches its first hybrid boat with electric propulsion

Danish yacht builder X-Yachts has thrown its weight behind the electric mobility revolution with the launch of its first all-electric boat. Called the X49E, the 15.08m boat has been a close collaboration between a very motivated owner and the yard’s expert technical team. It has also been a question of careful timing according to X-Yachts’ CEO Kraen Nielsen. “We didn’t want to be first movers on this area, but preferred to wait until technology and knowledge had matured properly,” he said. “And I’m really happy to say that the time is finally right to present the first X-Yacht with electric propulsion.” The beating heart of the system is the propulsion package designed by Finland’s Oceanvolt, with twin 10kW electric drives hooked up to 28.8kWh of lithium-ion batteries running at 48V. Variable pitch propellers make for super-efficient propulsion and, when running under sail, regeneration to recharge the batteries. Add in solar panels and a highly efficient DC generator to extend range, and you have a flexible package. X-Yachts calculates that the twin drives will be able to push the boat at a top speed of 7.3 knots. With the efficient hull shape drawn by the X-Yachts design team, the boat has a range of 9-12 nautical miles maxed out in electric mode. At 5 knots, the range more than doubles to between 22 and 30 nautical miles, depending on sea state and wind. At 4 knots, the range could touch 50 miles without starting the DC generator. “Every X-Yacht is designed with performance in mind – and the X4⁹E is no exception,” said Technical Manager John Morsing. “The hybrid concept on build number one has been chosen to make long-distance crossings possible without worrying about range limitations. When the DC generator is started and supplying the two Servoprops with 10-11kW of power, the boat is able to sail at 6.4 knots for as long as there’s fuel on board.” Regeneration is a key element of the system, because it allows the boat to generate her own power when sailing. Using Oceanvolt’s variable pitch system effectively supercharges the regeneration technology by optimising the angle of the propeller’s blades for maximum turning power

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Yachting World

Best sailing watches: 15 options for racing and cruising

Phil Sampson and Roger Hughes take a look at 15 of the best sailing watches available with functions for racing and cruising sailors Just as tablets and even smartphones have revolutionised how sailors use multifunction displays and instruments, so the latest smart watch technology has now firmly filtered into sailing. While we’re now familiar with using our watches to give us directions, make calls and send messages, and act as a repeater screen on our wrists ashore, so the latest sailing watches also make navigation, data and comms technology wearable afloat. However, the cleverest watch is not always the best watch for sailing. For racing an extremely simple and speedy to operate model may suit better. Price is not always an indicator of functionality either; even some of the least expensive sailing watches, like the Casio we showcase below, can be packed with features. At the other end of the scale,  luxury horology brands – including Rolex, Panerai, and Omega among others – have long been closely associated with sailing, seeing it as the perfect sport to demonstrate their style, waterproof and ruggedised qualities, and accuracy. In making our selection of the best sailing watches, we’ve chosen those with features specifically suitable for wearing aboard. That doesn’t mean, however, that they float, so be sure to do the clasp up securely and be wary of pulling off jacket sleeves in a hurry and losing your prized timepiece overboard! Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence. Best multi-function sailing watches Garmin Quatix 6 sailing watch Best smart sailing watch Read our in depth Quatix 6 review and long term test. This watch we tried out at length – it is a very comprehensive design, with functions for every type of pastime on the water, including diving. It is a beautifully crafted and extraordinary wrist computer. Garmin is well known for superior boating instruments and they have now managed to squeeze all the data of a ten-inch chartplotter into a 1.3” inch round sailing watch. Bluetooth functionality means you can connect it to a Garmin

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Yachting World

World’s coolest yachts: Cherub

We ask top sailors and marine industry gurus to choose the coolest and most innovative yachts (or in this case dinghy) of our times. Emma Richards nominates the Cherub The Cherub is a 12ft two-person dinghy with a single trapeze (twin in the UK), designed in 1951. It evolved into an international development class, with a wide range of designs in fleets across Australia, the UK and New Zealand. The class has recently undergone a major resurgence in New Zealand. “The Cherub is currently a big thing in our family,” explains Emma, who is married to Kiwi round the world sailor Mike ‘Moose’ Sanderson. “Mike has helped resurrect the class in New Zealand and he sails mainly with Merrick, our middle son, but everyone has sailed it. The Cherub definitely has sparked a love of sailing in the kids and rekindled grass roots sailing fun. It is super light and fast.” Cherubs are ideal ‘project’ boats, with hulls available cheaply or as self-build kits, and endless tinkering options. “Our local crowd is growing, kids racing with a parent or teenagers together,” says Richards. Parents joining the fleet include America’s Cup veterans Ray Davies and Dean Barker. The Cherub has rekindled grass roots sailing fun. Photo: Suellen Hurling/Live Sail Die Cherub stats rating: Top speed: 25 knots LOA: 3.65m/12ft Launched: 1951 Berths: 0 Price: from NZ$1,500 Adrenalin factor: 90% Emma Richards Emma Sanderson (née Richards) is a British ocean racer who sprang to fame when she became the youngest person to complete the Around Alone solo single-handed around the world race in 2002 aged 27. Prior to that she had been part of the all-female Jules Verne attempt on Royal & Sun Alliance, and raced in the Volvo Ocean Race on Amer Sports Two. If you enjoyed this…. Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for bluewater cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we have inspirational adventures and practical features to help you realise your sailing dreams. Build your knowledge with a subscription delivered to your door. See our latest offers and save at least 30% off the cover price. The post World’s coolest yachts: Cherub appeared first on Yachting World.

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