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Olympic sailing: Struggles for the big names on day one

Andy Rice reports from the Olympic Sailing competition in Tokyo as the first four fleets got their regattas underway in tricky conditions After two weeks of training in steady onshore breezes, it was all change for the opening day of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Sailing. On the Enoshima course, close to the sailing centre, the Men’s and Women’s RS:X Windsurfers opened with three races in a light and fluky east north easterly breeze blowing from the shore. The light air specialists were making their weight advantage pay, requiring the pre-regatta favourites to work extremely hard to stay in touch with the front of the fleet. It was even tougher over on the Kamakura course where the Laser Radial Women’s One Person Dinghy completed two stressful races that yielded two unexpected winners, followed by just one race for the Laser Men’s One Person Dinghy. Here the winner’s gun went to one of the event favourites while a number of other podium potentials were floundering further back in the pack. Photo: Sailing Energy / World Sailing Olympic sailing day 1: Laser Radial The opening day of the women’s one person dinghy, Laser Radial competition was full of surprises. The Kamakura course proved brutally tricky to read in the light, offshore winds, and some big names took a tumble today while some lesser known lights rose to the occasion. Few would have predicted that Germany’s Svenja Weger would emerge from the melée in first overall, following a solid fifth place in her opening race with a runaway victory in the next. Asked for the secret to her consistency, Weger said, “My coach gave me some really, really good information. I chose to go to the left side which was favoured a lot and which helped me have a good race. And then the second race, I don’t know… I just started in the middle and played it from there.” The German couldn’t hide her excitement. “It’s amazing. It’s amazing. I don’t know what to say about it. Like, I was almost crying when I was crossing the finish line, but it’s a great feeling. I couldn’t have imagined that the regatta would start like

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Yachting World

François Gabart launches latest record-chasing trimaran

François Gabart, the solo non-stop around the world record holder, has unveiled a radical new Ultim giant trimaran with ‘fighter jet’ helm stations Francois Gabart, currently the fastest man to sail solo non-stop around the world, has unveiled his latest trimaran, the radical SVR-Lazartigue. Previously codenamed ‘M101’ the trimaran has taken two and a half years to bring to fruition and yet again shifts the bar on what is considered radical in the giant foiling Ultim class. The most obvious innovation for the new trimaran is that it has no ‘cockpit’. Instead of a covered or protected cockpit, François Gabart – and his crew on crewed record attempts or races – will sail the boat from inside.  Launch day for Francois Gabart’s new Ultim trimaran SVR-Lazartigue. Note the steering ‘pods’ in the middle of the flush cockpit roof Photo: Maxime Horlaville Besides foil developments and the ongoing search for hydrodynamic improvements, François Gabart’s team has placed huge emphasis on the search for aerodynamic improvements. While some of the other Ultims have retro-fitted panels to improve aero efficiency, SVR-Lazartigue has been designed for flight from the outset. Key to this is the integration of the cockpit and living space within the central hull. Within the 5m2 central hull there are three main areas: a ‘cockpit’ to manoeuvre and steer the boat, a small galley space, and storage for sails etc. The cabin roof sits almost flush with the main arms and trampoline for minimum drag. Giant curved foils and hydraulic controls on the SVR-Lazartigue Ultim Photo: Maxime Horlaville Visibility forward is created via two fighter-jet style forward facing pods or ‘bubbles’, with a sliding access hatch – just like those on a military jet. The helmsman will be protected by a windscreen when sailing at high speeds – many Ultim skippers wear goggles to enable them to look into the wind and any spray. François Gabart and his crew will only go on deck for essential repairs, and manoeuvres such as some sail changes. Like Alex Thomson’s most recent Hugo Boss IMOCA 60, which also employed an inside cockpit, there will be exterior cameras to view on deck and around the trimaran. Also

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Yachting World

Who is Hannah Mills, Britain’s 2020 Olympic flagbearer?

One of sailing’s top Olympic performers and environmental campaigner, Hannah Mills is hoping to add another gold to her collection in 2020. The British sailing team’s Hannah Mills has been selected to carry the Union Jack in the Olympic opening ceremony tomorrow, Friday 23 July. The reigning 470 Olympic sailing champion says being named as a flagbearer for Team GB at Friday’s opening ceremony of Tokyo 2020 is the greatest honour of her career. Hannah Mills (left) with then crew Saskia Clark celebrate gold after their final race in Rio. Photo: Sailing Energy / World Sailing Mills won gold at Rio 2016 and silver at London 2012 in the 470 class alongside Saskia Clark, and is aiming to defend her gold in the women’s double-handed dinghy with new teammate Eilidh McIntyre. Hannah Mills will carry the Union Jack alongside rower Moe Sbihi, who won gold in the coxless four in Rio, in the first Olympic opening ceremony to feature both male and female athletes carrying each nation’s flag. Mills, 33, will also be the first female sailor to carry the Union flag. “To be asked to carry the flag for Team GB at the Opening Ceremony of the Olympic Games is not a sentence I ever thought I’d say,” she said after the announcement. “When (Chef de Mission) Mark (England) told me I had been chosen, it was completely overwhelming and when I had a moment to think about what it meant I got pretty emotional. “It is the greatest honour in my career and I hope more than ever before that this Games can lift our country and deliver some incredible sporting moments to inspire the nation.” Hannah Mills (left) and new crew Eilidh McIntyre racing in their 470. Photo: British Sailing / Lloyd images Hannah Mills and Eilidh McInytre go into Tokyo 2020 as one of Britain’s best Olympic gold medal hopes. Hannah Mills was already one of the most decorated British Olympic sailors when she paired with Eilidh in January 2017, having won a silver medal at London 2012 and a gold at Rio 2016. The images of her and long-standing crew Saskia Clark hugging and jumping

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Yachting World

Best water toys: the latest inflatables and kit for fun afloat

Toby Hodges looks at the latest inflatables, water toys, and accessories that will help maximise your enjoyment afloat in the sun Caption goes here With the Northern Hemisphere summer now in full swing many of us have our boats back on the water. But with long distance cruising still difficult, perhaps it is time to look at some fun inflatables and water toys to make the most out of your time on the water this summer. Here in the UK it may seem like we have a comically short summer season, but the Brits certainly like to make the most of the sun when it does choose to come out. While gearing up for your summer cruise or next long weekend in the sun however, have you considered which kit might maximise your enjoyment aboard? It’s still all about inflatable tech and electric power in the tenders and toys world – and some foiling too of course. Red Paddle Co Ride 10’6 stand up paddleboard A few years ago a step change in technology brought us the inflatable stand-up paddleboard (SUP). It was not long before many yacht owners added them to their inventory thanks to affordable prices, along with their compact size and light weight – some fit in a small backpack and weigh less than 8kg. These are fast becoming a replacement for inflatable dinghies for some. Nowadays you’ll likely be the odd one out in an anchorage if you don’t carry a SUP (or two) aboard – and in which you’ll be missing out on fun, exercise and some adventure for all the family. This will be our fourth year/season of using our Red Ride 10’6 and for much of the summer it replaces any need for a conventional inflatable tender. This remains the most popular all-round and near-bulletproof model available. The Plymouth-based company has since released a 9’6 Compact model, which better suits small lockers. Red Paddle Co Ride 10’6 deals Buy it now from Red Paddle Co Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence. Yamaha Seawing

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Yachting World

Olympic sailing: How to follow the Tokyo 2020 regatta

As the delayed Olympic Games finally get underway in Tokyo, we take a look at the best ways to follow the Olympic sailing competition For the 350 Olympic sailing athletes competing at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, a medal symbolises more than their skills; it is a reflection of the single-minded, obsessive nature that is required to embrace a lifestyle that has sport at its centre, 24 hours a day, seven days a week for years, sometimes decades at a stretch. 2020 will provide an even greater challenge than usual with the complexity of the Olympic sailing venue, Enoshima providing a tough area in which to compete. Additionally, Covid 19 has severely limited the time athletes have been able to spend in the Olympic venue in the build up to the Games themselves. In a normal Olympic cycle, teams would be based in the host venue for months ahead of an Olympic Games and would have endeavoured to sail in the venue as often as possible. This has not been possible in the build up to these Games, so the athletes will have tried to find venues closer to home that offer at least some similar attributes to Ennoshima. Unlike many sailing venues, Enoshima does not offer a specific set of conditions but can vary from light shifty onshore winds, to very windy and wavy offshore winds. Any regatta there can end up entirely light, entirely windy or some combination of both, making it something of an all-rounders’ venue. Of all this may well add up to one of the most unpredictable Olympic sailing regattas in many years. Photo: Sailing Energy / World Sailing How to watch Olympic Sailing on TV If you’re in the UK, your options are Eurosport/Discovery+ and the BBC. Unlike in past Olympics, the BBC will not be streaming all events live via the red button, so if you want to watch it live you’ll need to subscribe to Eurosport or Discovery+. The good news is it’s cheap – around £5 for the entire month. Via the Eurosport player, you’ll be able to watch live racing from one pre-determined course area each day. Article continues below… Tokyo

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Yachting World

First look: RP Nauta 151 – alloy flyer

The RP Nauta 151 superyacht is already under construction by builder Royal Huissman and promises to outperform existing alloy boats Royal Huisman is already hard at work building the RP Nauta 151, a 46m performance sloop by Reichel/Pugh and Nauta Design. It has been designed for a repeat client in aluminium, despite the overall aim of keeping weight down, but Nauta promises that it will put the existing alloy fleet to shame. Velocity predictions by Reichel/Pugh suggest that the boat will sail faster than the true wind speed – nearly 18 knots beam reaching in a 15-knot breeze. A key feature of the boat’s design has been the unobtrusive deckhouse, which echoes the owner’s previous boat. This is being built by Rondal in carbon alongside the guest cockpit and spars. As bluewater comfort was part of the brief, there are plenty of lounging options aboard. A section of the 10m-wide transom folds down to become a beach club, and the deck above transforms into elegant steps down. The aft deck can be adapted into a broad area for lounging and dining. The guest cockpit has a carbon hardtop and fold-down windscreen for ventilation. A recessed tender bay forward of the mast converts into a forward cockpit. Captive winches make sailing easy without disturbing guests. RP Nauta 151 specifications: LOA: 46.82m / 153ft 7inBerths: 8-10 owners/guests + 8 crewConstruction: Aluminum and carbon compositeBuilder: Royal Huisman If you enjoyed this…. Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for bluewater cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we have inspirational adventures and practical features to help you realise your sailing dreams. Build your knowledge with a subscription delivered to your door. See our latest offers and save at least 30% off the cover price. The post First look: RP Nauta 151 – alloy flyer appeared first on Yachting World.

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Yachting World

Have your say on Yachting World and get a chance to win a case of wine

We’re running a survey to find out more about your views on Yachting World. From refits to racing — and much more besides — we cover a lot of different topics at Yachting World. Now, we’d love to hear more from you, the readers, about your thoughts on the stories we produce, and your own interests and hobbies. The survey takes 10 to 15 minutes. To take part, go to yachtingworld.com/readersurvey — you’ll be redirected to the Yachting World survey page. Please rest assured that we will treat all your information in complete confidence. You don’t even have to share your name or email address, unless you’d like to be entered in the prize draw to win an award-winning case of wine from the Decanter World Wine Awards. The small print The survey runs until 23:59 on August 31. Full prize draw Ts&Cs can be read here: futureplc.com/competition-rules To enter the prize draw, you need to be over 18 years old and living in the UK (excl. Channel Islands). Please provide your name and email address at the end of the survey. It will be used only for prize draw purposes – winners will be notified via email by September 30. No cash alternative will be offered. The post Have your say on Yachting World and get a chance to win a case of wine appeared first on Yachting World.

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Yachting World

Hydrogen power: Is the future of onboard power here?

It has long been discussed but hydrogen power for yachts is starting to look set to become a green power source for yachts. Sam Fortescue investigates Nemesis One, a 101m luxury foiling cat capable of 50 knots, with hydrogen gas for emission-free propulsion We all know that hydrogen is the power of the future. After all, scientists have been discussing it for decades. Between zero emissions, zero noise and no vibration, it is surely the fuel that yacht owners have been waiting for. Why, then, is it taking so long to arrive, and when will we see hydrogen-powered boats? The answer to the last question is simple: they already exist. There is a commercial barge plying the River Seine through Paris running solely on hydrogen, for instance. At rush hour you can cross the harbour from Antwerp to Kruibeke in Belgium on Hydroville, the world’s first H2-powered passenger shuttle. And the well-publicised Energy Observer project successfully sent a solar-powered hydrogen yacht around the planet without using a drop of fossil fuel. Hydrogen power is stimulating the feverish imaginations of yacht designers searching for the next step forward in futuristic luxury. Energy Observer in the Svalbard Archipelago, August 2019. Photo: Energy Observer Productions In 2019 there was the lavish 112m motor yacht Aqua drawn by Dutch design powerhouse Sinot. It had features galore, including a swimming pool that gushed in steps down the long teak transom of the boat, a glass bow observation lounge and shell-like helical staircase running from the top to the lower deck. And at its core were two 28-tonne hydrogen vacuum tanks capable of storing the gas in liquid form at -253°C. With 4.4MW hydrogen fuel cells on board, this was enough to power the yacht to 17 knots and give her a 3,750-mile range. Then last year, news of the Nemesis One was released, a jet-black ‘stealth fighter’ of a catamaran engineered by multihull experts VPLP in pure carbon to foil at over 50 knots. The boat employs America’s Cup technology on a scale never seen before. Its towering 80m-plus soft autonomous AYRO Oceanwings wingsail is capable of generating huge power and twin L-shaped foils are

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Yachting World

SailGP: Australian team takes victory in British leg

Tom Slingsby’s Australian team won the British leg of SailGP, with fans treated to a fine show in sunny weather in Plymouth Thousands of fans turned up on Plymouth Hoe, and hundreds of spectator boats lined the F50 racecourse in Plymouth Sound as the sold out Great Britain SailGP took place over the weekend of 17-18 July. Tom Slingsby’s Australia SailGP Team celebrated its first victory of SailGP Season 2, being crowned event winners of the Great Britain SailGP, as thousands of sun-drenched fans were also treated to a race win for the home team. The Season 1 Champions were defeated by Great Britain in the final race of the Bermuda Sail Grand Prix presented by Hamilton Princess earlier this season, but got its revenge on British waters to make an astounding comeback, ultimately winning the event after a thrilling three-boat final between Australia, U.S and France. Slingsby said: “We’re now three events in, we’ve had lead changes at each one with different people winning each time, and we’re just starting the rollercoaster. We’ve got plenty more turns ahead. “We’ve come from close to the top of the leaderboard, to down at the bottom, and now we’re back at the top. There’s no form guide, every team has its day, and we’ve just got to hold on for the ride to try and make that Grand Final in San Francisco next March.” Celebrating with his Australia crew members was an ecstatic Nick Hutton, the team’s grinder, who hails from Devon, UK. Australia SailGP Team in action. Photo Jon Buckle / SailGP Hutton said: “It’s always great to win and for me it’s extra special winning in Plymouth. It’s as close as I’m ever going to get to racing at home so I’m super happy. The last race was very hectic for us, we didn’t make it easy for ourselves, but it was great to get it done.” The French team – driven by Billy Besson and with Brit Leigh McMillan onboard – was always in the hunt over the weekend and never out of the top three. After a nail biting final race – that saw multiple lead changes – they

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Yachting World

Paul Goodison on how to drive a foiling F50 in SailGP

Ahead of this weekend’s Great Britain SailGP in Plymouth, British helmsman Paul Goodison shares what it’s like to drive a foiling F50 catamaran Great Britain SailGP Team helmed by interim skipper Paul Goodison in action during a practice session ahead of Great Britain SailGP, Event 3, Season 2 in Plymouth, Great Britain. 15 July 2021. Photo: Ricardo Pinto for SailGP. Handout image supplied by SailGP Paul Goodison is one of the most talented foiling sailors around – he’s a three-time International Moth World Champion and was mainsail trimmer on the American Magic AC75 in this year’s America’s Cup, doing the same role on the Artemis Racing foiling catamaran in the previous Cup. Oh and he’s also an Olympic Gold medallist. But until a few weeks ago, he’d never competed in the SailGP circuit – which makes taking over the wheel of the foiling F50 for Ben Ainslie for the Great Britain SailGP Team all the more challenging. Having won the season opener in Bermuda, Ainslie stepped out of the circuit for two events (he recently announced the addition of their second child to the Ainslie family, congratulations to Ben and his wife Georgie), handing over to Goodison for the Italian stage of the tour. We spoke to ‘Goody’, as he is widely known, just before the start of the third SailGP event in Plymouth, UK, which kicks off tomorrow. “It’s very new,” he explains. “My my role with Artemis a long time ago was as the backup helmsman to start with and then I ended up being a wing trimmer when it came round to the 50. “Then the last time round I did a reasonable amount of driving the AC75 early on when Dean [Barker] was away, we swapped in and out a little bit, then I was racing as the wing trimmer in the last America’s Cup. To be stepping into this kind of fleet racing with eight boats and reaching starts is all quite exciting and quite different from what I’m used to. Article continues below… SailGP: All you need to know about the 2021 season When Larry Ellison and Russell Coutts launched SailGP back in 2018, the

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Yachting World

SailGP: Teams prepared for British leg

The third round of 2021’s SailGP season will see the teams competing in Plymouth. The championship is looking tight with plenty still up for grabs The Great Britain Sail Grand Prix is here, as the eight national SailGP teams go head-to-head in Plymouth this weekend hoping to win the third event of series’ second season. Great Britain, the home team for this event, won the opening event of the campaign in Bermuda, with Nathan Outteridge’s Japan being crowned Champion of event two in Taranto, Italy. Despite not winning either event so far, the Spanish team currently tops the Championship, and Australian helm, Phil Robertson, would love to prove the Spaniards’ title credentials by being crowned Great Britain Sail Grand Prix Champion. At the other end of the leaderboard sit Denmark and the United States, but only five points separates last place from first and a fine showing in Plymouth could turn a bad start to the season into a promising one. We’ve already had plenty of drama in Bermuda and Italy this season, and Plymouth promises more of the same. Brits hoping for a home SailGP win Champion of the opening event of the season in Bermuda, Great Britain endured a more disappointing sixth-placed finish in Taranto last time out under interim Driver Paul Goodison, who has stepping in, in Sir Ben Ainslie‘s absence. Goodison remains as skipper for the Brits’ home Sail Grand Prix in Plymouth, and he’ll be hoping for an improved performance in front ofthe home crowd. Great Britain still sit second in the season leaderboard despite the poor showing in Italy, and a home victory would see the British team further solidify its standing as one of the Championship favorites. Phil Robertson’s Spanish team currently top the championship. Photo: Ricardo Pinto / SailGP Spain look to extend SailGP lead Spain, despite not winning either event so far this campaign, is the only team ahead of the Brits in the Championship rankings right now. Phil Robertson’s team tops the leaderboard thanks to finishing fourth and third in Bermuda and Italy respectively, and he’s proven consistency across events is key to achieving success in SailGP. The Spanish will

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